Interview Advice

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polycounter lvl 11
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Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
Ok guys, my first interview ever is on monday, and this may be my only shot at getting a job for awhile so I'm trying to get all the help I can.

So far I have done everything I can to prepare(as far as interview skills go), I took a career development class in school (which was actually really helpful) but it still did not apply to the games industry specifically. I have listened to the game industry mentor podcasts on this subject over and over, but now I want to know what you guys on polycount have to say!

Please share any advice you have, and dos and donts that maybe you have seen other people do.

If anyone wants to share their story about what their first interview was like that could be helpful too.

I know every place is different but its still nice to get the input! Hopefully this thread will not only benefit me but others too!

Thanks!

*edit: Please post any interview questions you might have been asked! For me and future people!

Replies

  • crazyfingers
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    crazyfingers polycounter lvl 10
    Show some boob. Dudes, this can work for you too.

    Also read up about the company, be excited about their products. Try to get a feel for the vibe there and what they expect from their employees, then try to be that employee in the interview. It goes a long way to show that you've invested in the interview, you've done some homework. Talk about how what you can bring to their product, that you understand their aesthetic and you can hit the ground running.

    Don't be too eager, but let them know you're excited to be there. They say it all the time, but also just be yourself, good luck and take a deep breath, ain't no thang!
  • Justin Meisse
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    Justin Meisse polycounter lvl 14
    yeah, I'm sure most of this stuff has been covered in your class but:

    ask questions, it shows you are interested in the company. If the project hasn't been shown to the public yet, ask if you could see it... that falls in line with showing that you are interested.

    Bring a usb thumbdrive with your portfolio on it, if you did an art test take that too

    eye contact! confidence! Introduce yourself and shake hands. An interview is much like a sales pitch where you are the salesman and the product (woah, that's pretty cheesey sounding)

    Be prepared to answer a question about each item on your resume, I actually had an interviewer checking off items on my resume as he asked me questions.
  • Tulkamir
    Yep, I'd say that the most important stuff is to make sure you know the company you are applying to, and then relax a bit. Try not to think about it. I think that stress is the biggest killer for interviews. It's tough to get around, but just do what you gotta. Relax the night before, that kind of thing.

    The other thing I'd make sure you do is feel confident. Do whatever you gotta to get there, pump yourself up like an athlete before the big game, do some meditation, whatever. Just make sure that when you go in there, you are confident that you are, indeed, the absolute best person for that job. (That doesn't mean act arrogant about it, just go in knowing that you can do the job, and they will be convinced that you can).
  • Junkie_XL
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    Junkie_XL greentooth
    Who this is for?

    There is also a big difference between an interview with HR and someone on the actual art team. The latter is more fun and relaxing. The other tends to be too formal and more about body language, eye contact, a bunch of dumb questions, etc. I try to be funny. My northern Fargo-like red-neck accent aids in this.

    Take no more than a single shot of the highest proof liquor you can find. That'll help you relax and be yourself. I smile and look at peoples eyes more instead of exposing myself for the recluse that I really am.
  • disanski
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    disanski polycounter lvl 10
    I still don"t have a industry job but I remember my first interview I was so nervous and then the cab I got to take me to the place got lost ..... and then all the sudden everything was much better then I ever imagined. (almost got the job)
    Good luck
  • Justin Meisse
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    Justin Meisse polycounter lvl 14
    palm a basketball in the art-pit
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    The interview is for a small studio here in Dallas called Escalation Studios, they usually do outsource work for the bigger studios here (Gearbox) and they also do Wii and Iphone games. Since the place is pretty small all I really have to get to know about them is to look over every word of their website, which I have done...many times, and I have also talked to some people that I know who know the people there.

    Junkie- it is an interview with their Art Director, hes the one I have been talking to through most of the process. And as much as I would love to take a shot before I go I would probably just end up with an unfortunate headache in the middle of the interview if I did that.

    Thanks everyone for the advice, even if I have heard it before it always helps to hear it 2 days before so its fresh in your head.

    Does anyone know if there is a big difference between interviewing at a small studio and a big one? I can imagine there is, anyone have any experiences with this?
  • Justin Meisse
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    Justin Meisse polycounter lvl 14
    My interview at Mythic, a big studio, consisted of an interview with the Art Director, Lead Environment Artist, Hiring Manager and Tracy Hunt (he was the official/unofficial art lead for the scenario team).

    I've interviewed at a few studios ranging from 30-80 people and typically I ended up meeting with the whole art staff and on one occasion the GM of the studio.

    oh yeah, the one question you always get asked is "what games are you playing?" Might not sound like a hard question but I was so busy doing art tests and job hunting I had to really think about it.
  • danr
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    danr interpolator

    read up about the company

    this

    and don't mumble
  • Rens
    keep eye contact and devide this between people, give everyone the same amount of attention so they stay with you.

    I had an interview where one guy did most of the talking and the person next to him was like .. wasting time. Try and get them back into the conversation by asking him a question for example, eye contact him to keep his mind from wondering off.

    Smile, be friendly and smilely, brings a good feeling.

    Dont think about failing, because there is non. Every interview is a massive learning experience.

    When ever you feel like getting excited, take a deep breath, slow your heartbeat down and see that there actualy is nothing to it. You are there with a bunch of friends having a good time. When you speak, dont go to fast and make sure to make breaks. This will help calm you down, show confidence, but also it will allow you to think, before you speak. (dont make them wait long, just a second or two is fine)

    Go out to have fun and learn, and no matter how it turns out, you will get things in return.


    - in my case, i dont go around acting different for big studios, and when some staff is more formal then others, i still try to break it down to enjoying a conversation like with friends. They will give off signs if you go to far, but you are much more likely to be forgiven for that then if you dont show who you are. (so be yourself)

    - if you are not used to drinking, stay away from alcohol. Actualy, save it for after, its not wise to consume because it might fall weird ect. You control your emotions, go to the happy state and go for it.

    - oh and when they offer some like coffee, if you get hyper of that, its not weird to ask for something else.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    oh yeah, the one question you always get asked is "what games are you playing?" Might not sound like a hard question but I was so busy doing art tests and job hunting I had to really think about it.

    Haha yeah! Luckily I gave myself a break over christmas (since I knew no one was going to bother with me then as far as jobs go) and played some Assassins Creed 2, I could talk about how much I love that game for forever!

    Thanks to everyone again, Im gunna definitely try and remember everything you guys have said, luckily I think I have an easy time with confidence, but nerves can throw you for a loop so I hope Im alright.
  • Xoliul
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    Xoliul polycounter lvl 10
    Apart from everything that's mentioned here, I think for a small studio it's important to just be a cool person, and have some fun during the interview. Regardless of technicalities, you want the other person to remember you as a cool girl/guy afterwards, since subconciously, that's gonna have a whole lot of influence.
    Just be social, talk positive, fun things and be yourself. Especially at small studios the interview is most probably just to see if you're a cool person that would fit in. You shouldn't even be giving it too much thought. When I went to visit the studio I did my internship at, I spent like ... 4 hours in there talking to everybody, they showed me some Unreal Editor, I played their game, talked about the conutry and city, etc. Then when I asked them "so when's the interview?" they just laughed and said this was the interview. I ended up having a great time there.
    Same with my current job, even though it was a bit different as i already knew the people interviewing me (my former teachers), I went there with 0,0 preparation. I just had confidence that I'd be able to talk without problems. I ended up talking about motorcycles with my boss :)
  • Frump
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    Frump polycounter lvl 10
    Junkie_XL wrote: »
    Take no more than a single shot of the highest proof liquor you can find. That'll help you relax and be yourself. I smile and look at peoples eyes more instead of exposing myself for the recluse that I really am.

    Ha! I was going to ask if anyone has ever drank before an interview. Liquid confidence is still confidence. ;)

    If I ever get an interview I might try that. I'm very social and relaxed most of the time but when it comes to interviews and stuff I get harsh nerves.
  • Wells
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    Wells polycounter lvl 14
    palm a basketball in the art-pit

    and buy them beer!
  • Ben Apuna
    I think it was pior that mentioned in a thread like this one to take a printed version of your portfolio to an interview.

    Something easy to take out and distribute over a table surface. That way you can keep attention on your work. It's much easier for a group of people around a table to look at a bunch of prints rather than crowd around a single pc/laptop screen. There is also much less hassle of setting something up digitally.

    Good luck
  • EarthQuake
    Be yourself, and ask questions. An interview is a two-party thing, so make sure you ask plenty of questions. To me, that is the biggest thing. Ask questions about pipeline, technical stuff, anything that will show you understand various workflows are are eager to learn about exactly how they get stuff produced and into the game engine. Ask questions you KNOW the answers to, just to get started on a topic you feel may be a strength of yours, technically. That is my best advice.
  • Vailias
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    Vailias polycounter lvl 14
    I've read what Ben says is really useful, as you can take the pieces out and look at them, and if there is a group interview section they can be passed around and looked at etc.

    I interviewed with a small studio years ago, didn't get asked what games I was playing, but I met most of the staff during it. It wasn't a formal sit down q and a session, but more of a one on one with the art director, then around the studio a bit, met the president then a little longer and some more direct questions from the AD. Showing an active interest helps wherever you go.
    I actually got that job, then the project went poof before I could take it. The company sorta dwindled out after that.

    I had another interview a couple years back with much larger studio in the Bay Area. That one consisted of about 4 hours, 3 groups of people, first was some of the art team, second was some set of leads or other team management level people possibly an AD, and third I think was a producer or other higher up, who seemed really unhappy to have to be interviewing that day. (and no I didn't get that job)

    Also be well rested. On this mentioned interview I had to take an early morning flight out to make it with enough time to get from the airport to my interview appointment. I didn't sleep much, if at all due to worrying about sleeping through an alarm and missing the flight. So by the third part of that interview, and travelling a timezone over, I wasn't anywhere near as lucid as I wanted to be. Staying confident takes energy. :)

    I'm sure you;ll do well if you stay confident in yourself, and relax just a bit. They wouldn't be interviewing you in person if they didn't think you were decently capable of doing the job.
  • PixelFish
    - Know the company. Know their products. If you haven't played their products, I suggest doing so, but don't try to fake it, if you haven't.

    - Junkie XL makes a good point that HR interviews are different than team interviews. THAT said, I've only ever talked with HR on phone interviews. In-person interviews have almost always resulted in me signing an NDA and meeting actual team.

    - Have your portfolio handy. A printed version works, although I put mine on my iPod Touch as well, because you never know who you might bump into. You can also have a customised portfolio for each interview if you want....maybe have a piece you worked up in particular for a company. Don't rely on being next to a computer though--sometimes they shuffle you off into conference rooms, which may or may not have internet access or the appropriate equipment.

    - Be ready to ask questions of them. They almost always ask if you have questions, and you should figure out what you want in a company. This is your time to find out about them. Ask about their pipeline, management style, etc.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    I made some prints for my portfolio show a few weeks ago and it seems like whenever I get my stuff printed it never looks as nice as on the computer, the colors are never quite right and they came out pretty dark, plus the resolution of the texture and the print are very different. I would be kind of nervous giving them prints just because I know they dont look as good as they could. I will probably put my images on my hard drive though just in case, but I asked in one of my emails and he said to only bring art he hasn't seen yet, but everything I have is on my site. I am bringing a few sketchbooks to pass around though because he said he wanted to see 2d stuff, I have some life drawing and sketches that I'm pretty proud of.

    I would play their games but unfortunately I dont have a wii or an Iphone, but I have read reviews and looked up info on the games.

    Thanks again!
  • PixelMasher
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    PixelMasher high dynamic range
    One question I was asked is whats a great game art wise and I said uncharted 2, then 10 mins later they asked "how would you improve the art in uncharted 2" i was like sheeeeeit and made some random comment, so have some ideas in mind for something like that haha.
    I also second having a beer or a shot before hand. eye contact and posture are signs of confidence as well so giv'er in those departments.
  • Jesse Moody
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    Jesse Moody polycounter lvl 13
    SHOW SOME BOOBS!
  • Vonklaus
    Good luck with the Interview! Polycount is cheering you on!

    I will be in the same boat in a few days as well so this thread has been very helpful! Unfortunately I don't have man boobs or I know I would nail it, haha
  • Jason Young
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    Jason Young polycounter lvl 10
    SHOW SOME BOOBS!

    That's why this guy got hired. :thumbup:

    Be genuine. If you have valid questions, ask them. Don't just bring a list of bullshit so you "have questions". If you can hold a conversation, you'll be fine.
  • bounchfx
    SHOW SOME BOOBS!


    then you've laid it all out. you can't do that. you have to tease them first, with some cleave or maybe a little side boob.

    under boob if you're feeling saucy.

    god dammit I knew this would come up.



    but I second the asking questions bit - you KNOW you want/need a job but you seriously need to learn as much about them as possible too. don't overdo yourself. be casual, you'll be fine. a huge part of the interview is to make sure you'd be a good fit for the team personality wise
  • Rhinokey
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    Rhinokey polycounter lvl 11
    i just recently had a phone conversation with a creative dir at a studio i wanna work at and i started the conversation off swearing and screaming at him, and calling him an asshole,

    p.s. this tactic is probably the exception, not the rule
  • ZacD
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    ZacD interpolator
    Rhinokey wrote: »
    i just recently had a phone conversation with a creative dir at a studio i wanna work at and i started the conversation off swearing and screaming at him, and calling him an asshole,

    p.s. this tactic is probably the exception, not the rule

    Is it some kind of crazy reverse psychology?
    Did you get the job?



    Rule #1

    Always wear pants. Even during phone interviews, especially if you have pets.
  • Mezz
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    Mezz polycounter lvl 8
    No one touching on how to dress? (Well, other than how to dress your boobs... :P)

    From what I've gathered, this is one of the only industries where 'over dressing' is not as appreciated. Most interviews, a nice blouse or dress pants are appropriate... but I hear that for gaming interviews, just wear casual clothes (what you'd normally wear), just as long as it's all clean :P

    I had a female teacher (when I was taking my animation program) who told us other ladies NOT to ever wear a skirt to an interview in the animation industry (same for gaming). It would make them think you're too normal for the job, I guess... :P

    Feel free to share if any of you have expereinced this differently. (Um, relating to male clothes, since most of you will be posting from that perspective... men in skirts would be QUITE interesting at an interview, though... :P)
  • ZacD
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    ZacD interpolator
    Mezz wrote: »
    No one touching on how to dress? (Well, other than how to dress your boobs... :P)

    From what I've gathered, this is one of the only industries where 'over dressing' is not as appreciated. Most interviews, a nice blouse or dress pants are appropriate... but I hear that for gaming interviews, just wear casual clothes (what you'd normally wear), just as long as it's all clean :P


    I've heard to dress up like your going out, or one degree higher than the normal wear at the job (so in a game studio a decent polo or button up shirt).
  • Mazvix
    ZacD wrote: »
    I've heard to dress up like your going out, or one degree higher than the normal wear at the job (so in a game studio a decent polo or button up shirt).

    That is honestly one thing that bothered me with interviews, I mean what if you are ONLY used to wearing formal shirt, pants and a tie? Arghh it bugs me, why can't you be a geek/gamer AND be professional? It really sucks to not get the job just because you wore a tie or a suit...
  • ZacD
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    ZacD interpolator
    Your an artist not a businessman!
  • Canadian Ink
    1. Know your resume and be able to walk someone through it, answering a number of questions about past employment, school, skills...etc..at the top of your head

    2. Be able to speak to what games you like as an artist and why (in an informed way)

    3. If you have never had an industry job then you want to get let them know that you are fit to work in a professional environment, this includes being punctual, doing what your told and meeting deadlines....you would be surprised how many artists straight out of school can not manage simple things like that.

    4. Leave the Batman t-shirt and cargo shorts at home for the day and wear the standard I am an artist but am trying to look nice today (ironed button up shirt and some khakis)

    5. Stay calm, sometimes you get a question that you were not prepared for, its ok to take a minute to think about your answer instead of just blurting out the first thing that comes to you or babbling on and repeating yourself (it happens, ive done it)

    6. At the end of an interview fight the urge to take off like a deer that's just heard a gun shot...make sure you address everyone involved by name and thank them for your time....The impression you make is very important...ive seen mediocre artists get jobs because they do awesome in interview situations.

    GOOD LUCK!
  • bbob
    I have a question regarding dresscode aswell, because it is sort of bugging me.

    What if its sort of formal, but blatantly a bit excentric? Say a 30'ies style suit with an untucked shirt and a hat to match? Because I am sort of saving to be able to wear this every day. I know its perhaps a bit weird, but heck I'm an artist, what can I do?
  • undeadink
    i have a question also i have full sleaves and piercings, should i cover the tattoos, and take out the piercings?
  • MoP
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    MoP polycounter lvl 14
    We hired someone who came to interview in a suit, but we all thought it was a bit odd :)

    If it's a phone interview, try your hardest to sound enthusiastic and interested. It can be hard to get that across without facial expression or body language. Obviously don't go overboard though, it'll make you sound desperate or insane! :D
  • Rojo
    I made some prints for my portfolio show a few weeks ago and it seems like whenever I get my stuff printed it never looks as nice as on the computer, the colors are never quite right and they came out pretty dark, plus the resolution of the texture and the print are very different. I would be kind of nervous giving them prints just because I know they dont look as good as they could.

    I recommend bringing a printed portfolio as well.

    Printing an 8x10 at 300 DPI would mean you should render at 3000x2400 for a crisp print. Textures are blurry but that's expected, game art is painted for displays not print. For color, I guess you're at the mercy of the print shop for how well they calibrate their printers. If you've got any friends in graphic design have them make prints for you using the studio equipment, they'll come out perfect.
  • Rick Stirling
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    Rick Stirling polycounter lvl 14
    Be ready to talk about yourself as a person unrelated to the work - you know the hobbies and interestes bit that people cram on to the bottom of their c.v. (but I leave off).

    An interview is not just about the job, it's about the person.

    Research not only the company but the area where it is located, since if you get the job you are likely to be living there. When they ask "Have you any questions?" then you will be able to mention "Yes, I've been looking at rental prices around here, but I'm not familiar with the area - are there any places that I should avoid?"

    To reiterate:

    An interview is not just about the job.
  • poopinmymouth
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    poopinmymouth polycounter lvl 14
    Yeah for clothing try to wear layers. Meaning your lowest level should be a bit more informal than your top level, so you can strip if need be. I went to my interview at Neversoft in jeans and a polo, but with a suit jacket on top. I saw everyone else was pretty casually dressed, so before even sitting down I took off the jacket and put it over the back of the chair, bringing my level of formality down a bit, as I would have felt overdressed wearing a full suit (and would never do for a game interview) but seeing as it was a large company, I would have felt kind of crappy in jeans and a Tshirt if the owner was in a suit. (he was in a ranch-vest with handle bar mustache, so I neednt' have worried).

    For interviews I think the number one thing is to try to be relaxed. Don't be uptight, and be easy to talk to. If you see or hear anything from someone during the interview that you can relate to, try to briefly touch on it. If they bother to bring you in, your art has already been looked over and they are 95% or more satisfied with your abilities, now they want to meet *you*. The worst thing you can do is be uptight, not let the conversation flow, and leave with everyone forgetting you after 5 minutes.

    Also wait about 5 business hours after the interview (same day if it was in the morning, next day if it was in the evening) and write a brief thank you email saying you enjoyed the interview and getting to meet the team and see the studio. Keep it short but just touch base. If you don't get any reply back, wait 5 business days and send a brief response saying you are really excited about the prospect of working for said studio, and just wanted to touch base again. The purpose of these emails are really just reminders, so the body almost doesn't matter, so keep it brief, and don't let it sound desperate or pushy. All you want is more face time. The ideal outcome is for them to remember that (hopefully) they wanted to hire you, and maybe something needs to be pushed along that they forgot, and the email will be a perfect short reminder.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    Thanks poop I almost forgot about the thank you letter! I will have to do that!

    as far as dress goes (sorry this pic isnt the best) but this is what I plan on wearing

    17871_412642395440_743005440_106046.jpg

    Pink or no pink? I have other shirts I could wear but I like the pink one( it matches the pink on my glasses). And like Poop said I could always take off the jacket if I need to. The pants are black with like pinstripes.

    Not really a whole lot of boob though sorry guys, but its more form fitting than some of my button ups.
  • Jason Young
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    Jason Young polycounter lvl 10
    That works, and I don't see anything wrong with pink.

    Good luck!
  • Artifice
    I think that looks great. The black is standard 'working in an office' attire and the pink makes it pop a bit (you're an artist...show some pizazz!) It's not a CEO level powersuit, but that would be out of place anyway. It's a nice balance of professional and casual.

    One thing that always helps me in interviews for any job is to remember the people across from you are human too. They trip and fall, spill coffee on themselves, have families, etc. It's easy to get caught up in the idea that they know more than you and are asking the questions.. keeping in mind that they put their pants on one leg at a time can keep it casual and less intimidating. I guess it's a more subtle version of imagining the audience in their underwear. :)

    Best of luck with the interview, I'm anxious to hear how it goes!
  • slipsius
    B.O. = bad.... that includes TOO MUCH cologne/perfume.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    Artifice wrote: »
    I think that looks great. The black is standard 'working in an office' attire and the pink makes it pop a bit (you're an artist...show some pizazz!) It's not a CEO level powersuit, but that would be out of place anyway. It's a nice balance of professional and casual.

    Oh yeah that's exactly what I was thinking! Awesome

    I dont wear perfume it gives me a headache already I wouldn't want other people to suffer the same as me. But I do shower every day so I think Im good in the smell department. To others that go to interviews, clean is the best smell, just smell clean.
  • DarthNater
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    DarthNater polycounter lvl 10
    Lots of good info here, I'm surprised this hasn't popped up before.

    I do a lot of interviewing where I work (not game related) and about the only thing I can add that wasn't said is don't talk too much and keep the chat on point. I think poop hit this a little but it bugs the hell out of me when someone has to tell me about how bad their life is. Keep your past bad work experiences out too, well what I mean is, don't tell them you left you last job because your boss was an asshole. It doesn't look good when you bad mouth past employers, even if its true.

    Good luck!
  • Slave_zero
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    Slave_zero polycounter lvl 8
    If you have to travel a long way to your interview I would take the tour on the day before the interview and have a room in a hotel or what ever.

    You will be much more flexible, in case something goes wrong (flight delay, car breakdown) you still have enough time to make the appointment.

    The other advantage of this is: You can have some sleep before the interview instead of stepping out of the car after 5 hours of driving. You'll be much more relaxed.

    Another nice thing about that is, that you maybe have the chance to check out the city before the interview. This also may provide a topic to talk about in your interview.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    Thanks a lot everyone for all the help, it is definitely helping me be more prepared.

    I didn't know where the building was exactly but I knew the area and its about a 30min drive from my house so today I went and found the exact place I needed to go so I dont have to spend time looking for it. I also emailed my old career development teacher the other day and he wrote me back today, I thought I would post up the things he said in case anyone else wants to read this thread for their own benefit. He isn't from the game industry but he has experience working with students at my art school and understands some of the needs they might have.

    1. If you have a job description or set of job requirements available, let them know how you match up to to each of their stated requirements. Tell them of your skills, experience, and personality traits that line up directly with what they are looking for.


    2. Provide as many RESULTS from former work or school experience as you can (or outside organizations -- firms like to hire people who are involved in outside activities -- as such, employees serve as company ambassadors outside the doors of the company). Results provide strong credibility that you can do what you say you can do. Remember -- a business's sole purpose is to be profitable, so let them know you can help their bottom line, and this is where you can cite past accomplishments -- you can help them grow revenues, cut costs, improve customer satisfaction, improve quality, efficiency, productivity.


    3. Provide EXAMPLES to back up your answers wherever you can. "I work hard to meet assigned deadlines; in fact , one time I had a 24 timeframe to complete a critical project and I got it done in 12." That sort of thing...


    4. They want to see someone that they feel will represent their company well in front of stakeholders, so be confident and personable. Start out with a firm handshake, a smile, and maintain good eye contact throughout. Don't let your nerves suck the passion and energy out of you.


    5. Be familiar with the company. Make sure you know about their size, history, products and services, target market, and key competitors. Have they been in the news lately? The more you can let them see that you've done your homework on the company, the more impressed they will be.


    6. Let them know that you are on the cutting edge of the industry. You're familiar with the latest trends and technologies, and also tell how you keep current with such information.


    7. Do you have anything relevant you created that you can bring and show? (possibly on your laptop). Do you have a "leave behind" of sorts, even if it's your website that they can remember you by after the interview is over?


    8. When the interview wraps up, thank the interviewer for his/her time and make a closing statement how impressed you are with everything you heard about the company and the job, and that you believe you have the right blend of skills, experience, and traits to be a strong contributor to their team. Something along those lines... a parting sale pitch of sorts.


    9. Send a thank you letter immediately after the interview, thanking them for their time, and again telling how impressed you were with the company, and a statement that you believe you would be a strong asset to the company.
  • konstruct
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    konstruct polycounter lvl 13
    10. don`t psyche yourself out.

    I think its important to relax, and be as laid back as the situation warrants
  • jerry
    Reading that makes me uncomfortable, bit too much sucking up for my taste. Though I know things work a bit differently in the US.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    konstruct wrote: »
    10. don`t psyche yourself out.

    I think its important to relax, and be as laid back as the situation warrants

    Yeah this is my biggest fear, especially because I have so much time to prepare, Im worried that Im going to put too much pressure on myself to do everything right and then because of that I'll end up doing a lot of things wrong.

    Also I guess my confidence is a little decreased because this is the only company that has gotten back to me, I know I'm not the best artist ever but there were a few places where I thought I had a good chance. I keep telling myself that's how things go but I guess the more and more I look at my portfolio the more things I hate about it and want to change to make it better, but I haven't had time to do everything I want, that's the curse of an artist I guess. But I do believe I am qualified and capable of doing the job I am being interviewed for, so I guess I just have to keep telling myself that.
  • Firecracker197
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    Firecracker197 polycounter lvl 11
    jerry wrote: »
    Reading that makes me uncomfortable, bit too much sucking up for my taste. Though I know things work a bit differently in the US.

    I dont know, I think what he said about providing examples and giving results is a good idea, that way it makes it sound like your talking about your real life experiences instead of just saying things you know will sound good. It is one thing to say "oh yeah I'm good working with people" or you could actually give an example of when you did work on a team, then they would know that you actually can.

    The rest of the stuff is just mostly what other people on here have said, and I don't think people should be afraid to talk themselves up a bit, tell the company how you can help them, and they will definitely pay attention, but yeah that's more the American way.
  • jerry
    I dont know, I think what he said about providing examples and giving results is a good idea, that way it makes it sound like your talking about your real life experiences instead of just saying things you know will sound good. It is one thing to say "oh yeah I'm good working with people" or you could actually give an example of when you did work on a team, then they would know that you actually can.

    The rest of the stuff is just mostly what other people on here have said, and I don't think people should be afraid to talk themselves up a bit, tell the company how you can help them, and they will definitely pay attention, but yeah that's more the American way.

    :) Good luck.
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