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Problem with texturing non modular environment with repeating textures

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rgvsharma98 polycounter lvl 2

Hello,&nbsp;<br>My friends and I are trying to make an fps game and modelling part is almost finished, we are really stuck on how to approach texturing. Our buildings in environment are based on real location and to make them unique and as close to reference as we can, we did not make them in a modular way.&nbsp;



This is how one single building looks. 

Problem 1:- if i take this building into substance painter the overall quality reduces when i import it in unreal and walk close to it even if i texture with 2k sized maps. and by taking every building into substance painter individually it becomes hard to keep a consistent texel density. Even if i try to divide this building into multiple texture sets, it will be harder to manage so many textures since the overall map has 98 different buildings.

Problem 2:- If i try to decide a texel density first and then use seamless maps to texture, I don't know a way to hide obvious visible repetition. 


i have to make the red part of same concrete material but it looks really plain and repetitive like this.




I want to make it look something like this.

how can i make similarly eroding like this picture has near windows if i want to use small sized tileable textures.
And if I texture it in Substance painter using 2k or 4k textures, won't the size of those maps multiplied by 98 buildings make it laggy and heavy?

My greatest thank you in advance for any help!..

Replies

  • Ghogiel
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    Ghogiel greentooth
    The brown stains leaking under the window sill are decals. The blue paint paint coming off the brick  and the patches of damage around the windows on the top floor is probably a vertex blended material.

  • Eric Chadwick
    This kind on "unique" building can still be made with modular parts. I see a lot of repetition there. Don't forget, you can still mix in unique elements into modular sets, and even make large unique pieces that snap to smaller ones. A lot of power there!

    So apparently you've already built your models, but unfortunately you weren't able to plan ahead for some reason, so you have a full scene without textures.

    Take this as a learning experience, and rebuild according to established level design principles. Use blockout meshes (which can be your existing meshes), and adjust choke points, flow, etc. to make the area work best for FPS.
    http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/Level_Design
    All shooters based on real locations (GTA, Watch Dogs, etc) take liberties with the location, making changes for better gameplay, while keeping the same flavor of the real locations.

    Then once you have a good layout that plays well (but still looks very very plain) then you start replacing the blockouts with "pretty" textured meshes. That's your chance to use modular meshes, and gain all the benefits from them... detail level, memory optimization, texel density, etc.
    http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/Modular_environments

    Game dev is hard, but full of learning opportunities. I hope this helps!
  • rgvsharma98
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    rgvsharma98 polycounter lvl 2
    This kind on "unique" building can still be made with modular parts. I see a lot of repetition there. Don't forget, you can still mix in unique elements into modular sets, and even make large unique pieces that snap to smaller ones. A lot of power there!

    So apparently you've already built your models, but unfortunately you weren't able to plan ahead for some reason, so you have a full scene without textures.

    Take this as a learning experience, and rebuild according to established level design principles. Use blockout meshes (which can be your existing meshes), and adjust choke points, flow, etc. to make the area work best for FPS.
    http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/Level_Design
    All shooters based on real locations (GTA, Watch Dogs, etc) take liberties with the location, making changes for better gameplay, while keeping the same flavor of the real locations.

    Then once you have a good layout that plays well (but still looks very very plain) then you start replacing the blockouts with "pretty" textured meshes. That's your chance to use modular meshes, and gain all the benefits from them... detail level, memory optimization, texel density, etc.
    http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/Modular_environments

    Game dev is hard, but full of learning opportunities. I hope this helps!
    Thank you soo much. we kind of found a work around for our problem and but these links helped us a lot and i almost always forgot to thank you for your help. <3

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