Adjustable uv's possible?

polycounter lvl 7
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DavidCruz polycounter lvl 7
TLDR;
The idea behind the thread is to make it so any resolution is possible along with adjusting editing the Uv's at anytime for any reason say (better packing.)  I'd like to be able to adjust everything and not have to redo say a finalized texture.

Long:
Say you have a box, a cylinder, and circle, and a triangle, they are all on one map, say 1024x1024.

Then you only want the box and circle in the map, say on a 512x512 - these are already textured, is it possible to do this and still retain the textures? (i haven't played with udims so maybe udims work here?)

Reading this thread brought me to this curious question.
https://polycount.com/discussion/217936/trying-to-bake-very-seemingly-simple-normals-in-sp2-weird-notches-and-lines-on-edges-appearing#latest

-(Did i answer my own question?)
I suppose a copy of the working version rebaked into the new version would work here, guess i solved my own question.  -hmm was going to say i'd lose functionality in Substance Painter, but the id map would fix that.

P.s. if there is a program that does this, sharing is caring.

Replies

  • poopipe
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    poopipe quad damage
    Everything is possible 

    Painter will let you work independently of UVs but you need to be careful of positioning and bounding boxes

    If you make radical changes (Eg removing large chunks of your model) you need to look at alternatives that involve rebaking textures to new uvs
    Simplygon, substance designer and use of transfer maps/rtt in other apps all support this - some will account for uv tangent changes in normal maps, some won't.

    Whatever you do, you won't be able to add resolution to painted maps but your 1024 - 512 example is completely doable in a variety of tools
  • DavidCruz
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    DavidCruz polycounter lvl 7
    poopipe said:
    Whatever you do, you won't be able to add resolution to painted maps but your 1024 - 512 example is completely doable in a variety of tools
    ^I see, so even if my end result is a 512x512 as an example, the starting map should always be 4096 ? on my latest design for a challenge i made those textures at final resolution 2048x2048,  in the past (hand painted works) it was said that working at final resolution was the best option rather than scaling down, since scaling down caused blurring of pixels.  

    Thanks for the information, i checked out simplygon, looks really useful.
  • rollin
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    rollin greentooth
    DavidCruz said:
    (...), since scaling down caused blurring of pixels.  (...)


    I love those bits of ridiculous tips
    It's like "scaling down makes the pixels bigger" 

    Your starting texture resolution should be reasonable. Means: work in target resolution if possible.

    But you can down or up-scale depending on the software you use. E.g. if you don't really paint masks per hand and work with procedurally generated content you can under scale your work and just up the resolution when exporting to the final resolution.

    Also sometimes it's easier to work at higher resolution because your target resolution is just a bit too small for details to paint but good enough to show them nonetheless. 

  • poopipe
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    poopipe quad damage
    You don't have to work at 4k 

     if you know you're going to  paint 4 assets on one map and then split them up into 4 1024 maps then you need to paint the original at at least 2048 in order to prevent loss of information
  • DavidCruz
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    DavidCruz polycounter lvl 7
    Thanks gents this information helps me greatly, appreciate it.
     B) 
  • Deadly Nightshade
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    Deadly Nightshade polycounter lvl 7
    When working with Game Art you are still limited to using textures and UV-coordinates - texture painting can be a part of the pipeline but at the end of the day, the graphics engine is doing texture lookups (moving a texture from disk to memory) and projecting parts of the texture maps onto 3D-objects.

    But to go back to your topic:
    What you may want to look at is texture atlasing. There are tools and plug-ins for Unity and Maya that lets you move around UV's and edit the textures in an atlas without you having to do any manual work. If you work in a professional studio and you don't have this yet, you should talk to your Technical Artist about making an atlasing tool for Maya, Max, Blender (whatever 3D software you use). Trust me it will save you a lot of time. 
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