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Sketchbook: Gregory Stoffel

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  • Gotferdom
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    Gotferdom polycounter lvl 4
    Back to share a new wip i m currently working on, something different than my usual work, a realistic game ready model of a riot police officer. Working on detailling the cloth and armor. The shoes are still very wip.
  • Gotferdom
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    After a couple of weeks off, time to get back to work.
    Here's a wip of a game model of Goldorak/Grendizer rendered in Marmoset Toolbag.
    Actarus is coming soon too ;)
    And i'm also still working on the riot policeman....

  • Gotferdom
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    My take on Goldorak/Grendizer as a game model. One of my favorite anime growing up.
    Modeled/Sculpted in 3dsMax and Zbrush and textured in Substance Painter
    https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/goldorak-11900b5e3ac2490ead757797196c3323
    model


  • Gotferdom
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    I wasn't too happy with the render of my Cthulhu so i gave it another shot, this time rendered in Unity in HDRP.

  • Gotferdom
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    Hi everyone, 

    Here's my latest character "Ao Bouzu" a japanese yokai.
    I've always been interested in japaneses mythology and when i saw this yokai, i thought he could be a good candidate to sculpt and 3d print.
    This sculpt have been made for 3d printing in mind, but i thought i would made an illustration with him as well.

    The 3d printing is basically done, i'm doing the cleaning,sanding parts at the moment and will post it here once its done.
    Sculpted in ZBrush and rendered out of Keyshot with compositing in Photoshop

    Hope you like it.

  • Gotferdom
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    Hi everyone, new sculpt/illustration done in a couple of days after looking at some oni masks during the week-end.
    Zbrush/Keyshot/Photoshop for the sculpting and post.

    Hope you like it.


  • Gotferdom
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    Hi everyone,
    Here's my latest illustration made with Zbrush and rendered in Keyshot and some adjustment in Photoshop.
    I was going for a 70's retro sci fi style for this one.
    Hope you like it.

  • Gotferdom
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    I enjoyed making Ao Bouzu, the Yokai a few month ago so much, that i have decided to make a serie of these guys, i'm just  not sure how many i'm going to make...All will be sculpted in Zbrush and rendered in Keyshot and made ready for 3d printing as i'm planning to have this collection sitting on my shelf.
    Here's the new ones in the collection:

    Abura Sumashi


    Ao Andon


    Akaname


  • Gotferdom
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    New yokai in the collection: Amefuri kozō

    Rainfall priest boy
    Their task it to cause rainfall.
    Usually shy and rarely interact directly with people, they are known to enjoy stealing people's umbrellas and wearing them as hats, they then cause rain to fall upon their victims.

  • Gotferdom
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    Aka Shita
    赤舌
    あかした
    Translation: Red mouth
    Mysterious spirit which takes the form of a dark cloud with sharp claws, hairy face and a long red tongue.
    Its body is hidden inside the dark clouds in which it lives.
    Appears during the summer months, when rain and water are at their highest demand and the water is carefully controlled and distributed equally to farmers.
    Some farmers would siphon above the allotted amount of water for their personal fields which was a great crime and could cost neighboring farmers their livelihood.
    The perpetrators of this crime would be punished by Akashita who would appear and swallow them, scooping them up with its giant red tongue.

  • Gotferdom
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    Amabie
    アマビエ
    あまびえ
    The origin of its name is a mystery. There is only one record of amabie in existence, and it appears very similar to another yokai with a similar name: amabiko. 
    Mermaid like yokai with a mixture of human and fish features, a  beak-like mouth, three legs or tail-fins and long hair.
    It glows with a bright light that can be seen from the shore.
    It emerges from the sea, prophesies either an abundant harvest or an epidemic.
    Keeping a picture of this Yokai can protect you from disease.

  • Gotferdom
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    Bake ichō no sei
    化け銀杏の精
    ばけいちょうのせい

    Translation: monster ginkgo spirit

    Bake ichō no sei are the spirits of ginkgo trees. They are very tall, with bright yellow bodies the color of ginkgo leaves in autumn. They wear tattered old black kimono and carry small gongs.
    They appear near very old ginkgo trees and strike their mallets. It’s not known whether there is some purpose to this other than making those who hear them feel strange or shocked.

  • Gotferdom
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    Bakezōri
    化け草履
    ばけぞうり

    Translation: ghost zōri (traditional straw sandals)

    When the straw sandals known as zōri have been mistreated and forgotten by their owners, they can transform into sandal-yōkai called Bakezōri.
    These sandal-shaped yōkai sprout arms and legs from their bodies and a single, large eye in their centers. They run about the house at night, causing mischief and making noise. Bakezōri have a favorite chant, which they sing as they run about the house on their tiny feet:

    Kararin! Kororin! Kankororin! Managu mittsu ni ha ninmai!
    Kararin! Kororin! Kankororin! Eyes three and teeth two!


  • Gotferdom
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    Betobetosan
    べとべとさん
    Translation: from the sound of footsteps
    Betobeto-San is a yôkai that follows travellers at night, making the sound "beto beto" with its wooden sandals. It cannot be seen; only heard.
    People who walk the streets alone at night might encounter these harmless, but nonetheless disturbing, yōkai. They synchronize their pace with walkers and follow them as long as they can, getting closer and closer with every step. For the victims, this can be traumatic. The haunting sound of footsteps follows them wherever they go, but when they turn around, there is nothing there.
    Though betobetosan can be disconcerting, they are not dangerous. Once you realize you are being followed by a betobetosan, simply step to the side of the road and say “After you, betobetosan.” That is enough to escape from this yōkai. The footsteps will carry on ahead and soon vanish from earshot, allowing you to continue in peace.

  • Gotferdom
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    Amanojaku
    天邪鬼
    あまのじゃく

    Translation: heavenly evil spirits

    Amanojaku are wicked monsters which have been known since before written history in Japan. They are described as evil kami, minor oni, or yōkai who cause mischief and perform evil deeds. In particular, they are known for provoking humans into acting upon the wicked, impious desires buried deep within their hearts. They spread spiritual pollution wherever they go.

  • Gotferdom
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    Furuōgi
    古扇
    ふるおうぎ

    Translation: old folding fan

    Furuōgi is a squat, hairy yōkai with an old, worn out folding fan sprouting from its back.
    Furuōgi appears in some of the earliest Hyakki yagyō emaki, pictures scrolls of the night parade of one hundred demons, along with a number of other tsukumogami. Early yokai scrolls did not give names or descriptions, so nothing about furuōgi is known other than its appearance. Even its name was added much later.

  • Gotferdom
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    Gangi kozō
    岸涯小僧
    がんぎこぞう

    Translation: riverbank priest boy


    Gangi kozō are hairy, monkey-like water spirits which inhabit rivers. They live along the riverbanks, where they hunt fish. Their bodies are covered in hair, and the hair on their head resembles the the bobbed okappa hair style once popular among children in Japan. Their most notable features are their webbed hands and toes, and their long teeth which are sharp and jagged like files. They are close relatives of the much more well-known kappa.

    Gangi kozō are not encountered outside of the riverbanks, according to one theory, they are a transitional form of kappa. 
    Gangi kozō normally stay away from people, but occasionally encounter fishermen along the rivers they inhabit. 
    When meeting a gangi kozō, fishermen often leave their largest, cheapest fish on the riverside as an offering.


  • Gotferdom
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    Fukuro Mujina
    袋狢
    ふくろむじな

    Translation: bag badger

    Fukuro mujina look like mujina (badgers; however this word sometimes refers to tanuki as well) dressed in human clothes and make up resembling ancient noblewomen. A very large sack is slung over their shoulder.

    Mujina are known to be tricksters, dressing up in various human costumes and masquerading as people. However, because this yōkai originally appears in a collection of tsukumogami, it is likely that fukuro mujina are actually haunted bags which take on the appearance of mujina, rather than mujina pretending to be humans.


  • Gotferdom
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    Garappa
    ガラッパ
    がらっぱ

    Translation: a regional corruption of kappa

    Garappa are river spirits found on the islands of Kyūshū in southern Japan. Close relatives of kappa, they resemble them in many ways. The two are often confused with each other, although there are a number of important differences. 
    A garappa’s limbs are much longer than those of a kappa. When garappa sit down their knees rise high above their heads, unlike the stubby kappa’s knees. 
    Because of these longer limbs, garappa are taller than kappa when standing upright. Garappa also have slightly longer and more streamlined faces.

    Garappa are shyer and more elusive than kappa. They tend to avoid populated areas and instead, wander back and forth between the rivers and mountains. 
    Garappa live in smaller groups, or by themselves. Because of their shyness, garappa are more often heard than seen. They have two distinctive calls: “hyō hyō” and, “foon foon foon.”

    While garappa encounters are much rarer than kappa, they share a similar relationship with humankind. 
    Extremely fond of pranks and mischief, garappa love to surprise people on mountain paths, or trick travelers into losing their way. 
    Like kappa, garappa are physically stronger than humans and are easily capable of overpowering grown men larger than themselves. They are extremely fond of sumo wrestling, at which they are highly skilled. 


  • Gotferdom
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    Little break from the Yokai collection to finish this statue.

    Krombopulos Michael sculpted in Zbrush and printed in PLA on a Creality Ender 3 V2 
    My biggest statue so far, made for a friend's birthday, obviously fan of Rick and Morty.

    Krombopulos Michael is 37 cm high and is composed of 11 parts
    Each Mr Meeseeks is between 23-25 cm and composed of 2 parts to fit the bed of the printer.
















  • Gotferdom
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    Back on the Yokai collection with one of the weirdest so far:
    Gyōchū
    Gyouchuu, Kitai, Mimimushi
    蟯虫
    ぎょうちゅう

    Translation: intestinal worm; pinworm


    Gyōchū are infectious yokai with six arms and long red tongues. They are extremely fond of chatting and gossiping. 
    They live and reproduce in the sex organs, making them a sexually transmitted yōkai. Gyōchū reproduce in the sex organs on Kōshin night, a holy night which occurs every sixty days in the esoteric Kōshin religion. 
    Gyōchū leave their hosts on these nights and visit Enma Daiō, the king of hell and judge of the damned. 
    They tattle on their hosts, telling all of their dreams, desires, and sins to Enma, who will inflict his divine wrath on them accordingly.

    There is no treatment for a gyōchū infection. The only way to keep safe from this infection is to avoid any chance of contracting an infection by abstaining from sex on Kōshin night. 
    Traditionally, Kōshin night is reserved for praying. Believers gather together and refrain from sleeping for the whole night, so faithful practitioners should have no problem avoiding contracting gyōchū. 
    People who have sex on these holy nights are committing a grave sacrilege, which the gyōchū will report to King Enma. 
    During the feudal era, terrible diseases (leprosy, for example) were believed to be divine punishments for those who disrespect the gods.

  • Gotferdom
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    Ippondatara
    一本踏鞴
    いっぽんだたら

    Translation: one-legged bellows
    Habitat: mountains
    Diet: unknown, but kills humans one day per year

    Ippondatara has one thick, trunk-like leg and a single saucer-like eye. It lives deep in the mountains of Japan. It is especially well-known in the mountains bordering Wakayama and Nara Prefectures (old Kii and Yamato Provinces), though sightings have been reported in other neighboring prefectures as well.

    Ippondatara is a shy yōkai, and tends to stay away from inhabited areas. It moves about by hopping around and doing somersaults. It avoids humans, though on winter days it is not uncommon to find the unique prints of this yōkai’s large, single foot in the snow.

    While it is mostly harmless, once per year on December 20th, the ippondatara turns violent. Those entering the mountains on that day who run into the ippondatara are squashed flat under its powerful foot. Because of this, December 20th is considered an unlucky day in the areas where this yōkai lives. People stay out of the mountains then.

    The name ippondatara comes from tatara, the bellows that a blacksmith would use in the old days. This yōkai is said to resemble a master blacksmith who lost the use of one eye from years of starting at the intense flames, and lost the use of one leg from years of heavy work pumping the bellows.

    There are many theories about the origin of this yōkai. In some villages, it is considered to be a cousin of a certain breed of kappa called gōrai which—every winter—transform from river spirits into mountain spirits called kashambo until they return to the rivers in spring. Ippondatara is said to be a kind of kashambo.

    Other explanations describe the ippondatara as the ghost of a woodcutter who cut off one of his legs in penance for some crime. Or it may be the ghost of a famous one-legged, one-eyed robber named Hitotsudatara who lived in the mountains of Wakayama and had supernatural strength. It may even be the ghost of a giant boar who used to roam the mountains killing hunters. A high priest was able to bind the boar’s spirit and keep it from harming people, but the conditions of the magic that binds this ghost allow it to roam free one day per year—on December 20th.

    It has also been suggested that it is a kind of mountain kami which was corrupted over the ages and became a yōkai. A single eye is a common feature among mountain spirits, and other one-eyed yōkai (such as hitotsume kozō) originated as mountain kami as well.


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    Hyakume
    百目
    ひゃくめ

    Translation: one hundred eyes

    Like their name suggests, hyakume are covered from head to foot with countless blinking, yellow eyes. Underneath those eyes are fleshy, roughly man-sized bodies. With their eyes closed, they resemble pink lumps of flesh, and are nearly indistinguishable from nuppeppō (which live in a similar habitat).
    Hyakume make their homes in old temples, guarding them from would-be thieves during the night. During the day, the sky is too bright for their many sensitive eyes. They only come out at night, spending the lighter hours in dark and shadowy buildings where few humans ever go.
    Hyakume are shy and try to avoid human contact. Should a human come within a few meters of a hyakume, one of its eyes will detach from its body and fly towards the person. The eye sticks to the person’s body for as long as he or she is in the area, keeping an eye out for criminal activity. Eventually the eye will return to the yōkai when they perceive there is no danger. When hyakume feel threatened, they jump out of the darkness in a menacing manner. 
    They are not particularly violent and rely on their size and fearsome appearance to scare humans away.

  • Gotferdom
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    Yokai #20 in my collection:
    Karakasa kozō
    唐傘小僧
    からかさこぞう

    Translation: paper umbrella priest boy

    These silly looking yōkai are transformations of Chinese-style oiled-paper umbrellas. They have a single large eye, a long, protruding tongue, and either one or two legs upon which they hop around wildly.
    Karakasa kozō are not particularly fearsome as far as yōkai go. Their favorite method of surprising humans is to sneak up on them and deliver a large, oily lick with their enormous tongues—which may be traumatic even though it isn’t dangerous. Caution is advised, however. There are other umbrella tsukumogami which are dangerous to humans, and care should be taken not to confuse them with this more playful spirit.

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    Kawauso
    かわうそ

    Translation: river otter

    River otters can be found in the wilds all over Japan. They are under a meter in length, cute and furry, and well-loved for their shy, playful nature.
    As with most wild animals in Japan, kawauso develop magical powers upon reaching old age. They are particularly skilled at shape-changing and accurately copying sounds. Kawauso love alcohol, and are usually only seen in human areas trying to acquire sake. They are playful yōkai, well known for their tricks and mischief, but rarely dangerous.
    Kawauso are fond of playing pranks on humans, especially by mimicking sounds and words. They enjoy calling out human names or random words at strangers walking in the street and watching their confused reactions. They are fond of magically snuffing out lanterns in the night and leaving travelers stranded in the dark. Kawauso sometimes even transform into beautiful young women and try to seduce young men—only to run away laughing when the men take the hook.
    Occasionally, kawauso commit more violent deeds. In a few instances near castles in Ishikawa, a kawauso dressed up as beautiful young woman and lured young men to the water’s edge in order to catch and eat them, discarding the half-eaten bodies into the moat. But stories like this are rare.

    Other forms: A kawauso’s favorite disguise is the form of a young beggar child wearing a big straw hat. They use this child form to sneak into towns and try to buy alcohol from shops. The ruse often falls apart when the disguised creature is asked who it is, or where it came from. Caught off guard, the kawauso simply repeats the last word spoken to it, or makes funny nonsensical noises. This ruins its disguise and gives away its supernatural nature.

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    Koto furunushi
    琴古主
    ことふるぬし

    Translation: old koto master

    The Koto furunushi looks like a koto—a long, harp-like instrument that is the national instrument of Japan—transformed into a wild beast.
    A koto which was once played frequently but later forgotten about and stored away can transform into the koto furunushi. These yōkai may look like wild beasts, but they remember every song that was ever played on them. Koto furunushi play when no one is around, causing everyone to wonder where the music is coming from. They prefer to play old, forgotten tunes that have fallen out of style and vanished from people’s memory.

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    Isogashi
    いそがし

    Translation: busy

    Isogashi is a blue-skinned monster with floppy ears, a big nose, and a massive tongue which flops out from its mouth. It runs about frantically, as if it had a million things that it needs to do. It is a type of tsukimono, a class of yōkai which possess humans.
    Humans possessed by isogashi become extremely restless and unable to relax. They constantly move about, doing things. However, this is not an unpleasant feeling. On the contrary, people possessed by isogashi feel a sense of security in getting things done. Sitting around and doing nothing at all makes them feel as if they are doing something wrong.


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    Hiderigami

    ひでりがみ

    Translation: drought spirit
    Alternate names: batsu, kanbo (“drought mother”), shinchi
    Habitat: mountains
    Diet: moisture

    Hiderigami is a grotesque, hairy humanoid which stands between two and three feet tall. It has a single eye on the top of its head. It only has a single arm and a single leg, although it can run as fast as the wind. All hiderigami are female.
    Hiderigami are rarely encountered by humans. They live deep in the mountains and only rarely travel out into human-inhabited lands, but when they do their presence can be strongly felt over a wide area. A hiderigami’s body exerts such a strong heat that everywhere it goes the ground dries up, clouds fail to form, and rain cannot fall. Despite the incredible danger that they pose, it is said that throwing a hiderigami into a toilet will kill it.
    Hiderigami originated in southern China, and come from a goddess. Their origin is recorded in some of the oldest ancient Chinese records. When the legendary Yellow Emperor of China fought the warlord Chi You, he summon a powerful goddess named Batsu to aid him in battle. Batsu contained an supernatural heat inside of her, and when she released her power, the battle was quickly and decisively won in the emperor’s favor; however, she had used so much of her power up that she was unable to return to Heaven or contain her heat. While Batsu was nearby, the waters all dried up and rain would not fall, and so her presence became a terrible problem for the emperor. Unable to kill her or to send her back to heaven, the emperor exiled the goddess to a far-away mountain and forbade her to return. Whether Batsu became the mother of the hiderigami or became corrupted and transformed into this yokai herself is unknown.
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