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How much is Mari used?

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I am starting to feel like I'm being taught and learning to use a texturing program that is not used much at all. How much is The Foundry Mari used out there? Is texturing with Mari a lot different than texturing in Photoshop? Because with Mari, I don't have to think about seams much, a mindset that could be a problem when I have to switch to texture with Photoshop.

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  • Ark
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    Ark polycounter lvl 11
    Anyone who resists new tools like Mari, Substance Designer, Marvelous Designer, etc is going to quickly find themselves extinct. Embrace change or perish.

    Yeah because traditional art died out as well when digital art emerged. :P

    There still pretty much situational tools, not gonna replace Photoshop or Max/Maya
  • DerekLeBrun
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    DerekLeBrun polycounter lvl 11
    Does Mari really have much going for it that you wouldn't be able to do in Mudbox or a more robust future update to Zbrush's polypaint with layers/blending modes?
  • Ruz
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    Ruz ngon master
    I found it incredibly slow , so gave it a miss
  • Ark
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    Ark polycounter lvl 11
    That's a very weak comparison. But since you made it...

    I don't think it's a weak comparison at all. Art is Art, no matter how it's made. Would it be better if I compared a paintbrush and paper to zbrush?
    1) No, digital art didn't "kill" tradition art, but it did relegate it to being not much more than a glorified hobby, with the exception of a few extremely dedicated people who have managed to carve out a career making oil paintings and sculpting. So yes those people are out there, but they're definitely the minority and in terms of commercial work, it's very heavily skewed toward digital. I'm not marginalizing those people or their craft. In fact I have a huge amount of respect for them.

    Maybe it's not has popular with younger people, but traditional art is still around, go into any college and I can guarantee that there'll be more traditional art courses than there are art related CG courses. Been into any art galleries lately, yup nearly all traditional art.
    2) I said Mari is gaining tracking, not that it's taken over and killed Photoshop. One is hyperbolic, the other isn't. But hey, thanks for taking what I said way out of context, that's awesome.

    I didn't take it out of context, you said anyone that resists these new tools will be extinct. So someone that sticks with Photoshop and Max in five years will be extinct because they didn't learn some specific situational program that does one thing good? Max and Photoshop cater to a much broader feature set than than these new tools.
    I know it's good to learn new software and look forward in to future tech, but these programs will still be in a niece are of CG.
    3) How much luck do you think you would have getting a 3D art job in most studios if you neglected to learn, oh say, ZBrush? Of course it depends a great deal on the studio and the sort of games they make, but ZBrush is pretty pervasive at this point. Try walking into an interview with that giant chip you've obviously got on your shoulder and telling them you don't need their new-fangled digital sculpting software, you'll just do it with clay. Good luck with that.

    Learning ZBrush is all fine and dandy, but again if your traditional art knowledge fails, learning ZBrush doesn't teach you anatomy and form, but traditional sculpting does.

    I can bet any employer would choose someone with awesome traditional art skills and medicorce program knowledge, than someone with awesome knowledge of Zbrush, but poor sculpting skills.

    Traditional art will always be priority over program knowledge, anyone computer literate can learn max or maya and get the basics in a day, try learning something multi-tiered like art is gonna be a lot longer and more beneficial at the end of the day.
  • jgreasley
    In VFX Mari has almost completely replaced Photoshop in many artists workflows. Not to say that you can do everything in Mari, but that whereas before artists would spend 90% of their time in PS, they now spend 90% of their time in Mari.

    This obviously holds true to varying amounts but is a story we hear often.
  • MeshModeler
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    MeshModeler polycounter lvl 8
    This is how we use it at work. Custom shaders, some interface improvements

    http://vimeo.com/65408722
  • jgreasley
  • jgreasley
    Thanks for posting that video. I think the ability to easily replace Mari's inbuilt shaders to match in game assets is one it's most interesting features for games developers.
  • MeshModeler
  • Equanim
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    Equanim polycounter lvl 10
    Can someone spell out the advantages of Mari? I've seen some really impressive work done with it, it's been around for years, and it's pretty pricey, but whenever I read about it, I end up finding something like "the next update might support layers!", or "it only works well with the following graphics cards..."

    The shader support that MeshModeler linked is pretty cool. What separates Mari from its competitors though?
  • Zpanzer
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    Zpanzer polycounter lvl 8
    Please do remember that Mari's strongpoint is that it's optimized for and rooted in the VFX business. It handles 8 uv islands with 8k maps at the same time without any problem. It's a godsend for guys working with very high-end 3d.

    I actually believe that it was created at WETA
  • Equanim
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    Equanim polycounter lvl 10
    Zpanzer wrote: »
    Please do remember that Mari's strongpoint is that it's optimized for and rooted in the VFX business. It handles 8 uv islands with 8k maps at the same time without any problem. It's a godsend for guys working with very high-end 3d.

    Well, that answers my question :)

    There's also this, for anyone else wondering...

    http://vimeo.com/61793424#at=150


    Desperad0
    , to answer your question, yes, texturing in Photoshop alone is very different from something like Mari. However, modern workflows often use either both, or would stick to a 3D paint program like Mari. The advantage to using both is that you can paint directly onto your model, where seams become less of a concern, but you still have access to all of Photoshop's post-processing features. What's important is that you have a solid understanding of UV mapping and how it impacts your texture, regardless of the program.

    I haven't used Mari, but I have used Bodypaint, 3DCoat, Mudbox and ZBrush. From what I see, your skills with Mari should carry over to those applications very easily.
  • Zpanzer
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    Zpanzer polycounter lvl 8
    Equanim wrote: »
    Well, that answers my question :)

    There's also this, for anyone else wondering...

    http://vimeo.com/61793424#at=150

    That being said, I'm sure many people can find use for it working with game assets. It's after all a pixel based painting program with deep PSD integration(and adjustment layer if memory serves me well), procedural layers such as fractal noises and more. I really think it's worth for any texture artist to at least give the free trial a drive.
  • Ghostscape
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    Ghostscape polycounter lvl 13
    Photoshop will not be replaced by Mari, but it is definitely augmented by it. Much in the same way that Zbrush and Maya/Max augment each other.

    While I agree anyone learning about the industry should be learning about Mari right now, I disagree with the notion that you can learn Mari and skip Photoshop, which the OP is suggesting. We still use Photoshop at RAD - but we also use Zbrush polypaints and Mari - they're all useful tools for manipulating color data and generating color maps.

    I think Mari's acceptance in the industry is about where Zbrush's was 5-6 years ago.
  • Desperad0
    Even with my short experience with Mari, I can see how powerful it is as a texturing tool - especially if you're doing photo-real. It is, however, REALLY expensive both in dollars (pounds, yen, what have you), as well as RAM usage. Every time I work in Mari, the only other thing I dare risk running is Windows Media Player. That's it, or not only will Mari likely to freeze/crash, a couple of times the entire computer froze! And the school's computers are brand new and pretty good built!

    That's why I ask how much it is used because it seems to me only big studios can afford Mari. If you're freelance or indie or small... will you still consider Mari?
  • oXYnary
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    oXYnary polycounter lvl 17
    Unless Mari comes way down in price, only the top tier companies will be using it Dustin. Sure it would be great to learn. Legally though unless your a student would be hard to swallow that cost ontop of a 3d package. Mudbox is less than half and while not as powerful, can paint quite good from all accounts.

    Also, substance designer. Everything I have seen looks great for vfx and environmental artist. But other than tweaking settings on skin tones, I cant see it being much more useful than photoshop adjustment layers for character work.
  • Justin Meisse
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    Justin Meisse polycounter lvl 17
    Art is hard, tools are easy, watch a bad ass concept artist play around in Zbrush for the first time. Being able to paint a texture in any app will transfer over.
  • Justin Meisse
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    Justin Meisse polycounter lvl 17
    I never mentioned traditional. I've never used Mari but most 3d painting apps I've used have been pretty easy to dive in, everything I know about 3D & Photoshop prepared me for it. The OP should be fine working in any other texturing program.
  • Irreal
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    Irreal polycounter lvl 10
    I'm finding that I'm using Photoshop less and less. It's never had features that have catered specifically to a game production pipeline. We just ended up using it because it was the best at what it did. Now we are getting products that actually cater to our needs/workflows such as Mari, Substance etc.
  • Ark
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    Ark polycounter lvl 11
    DKK wrote: »
    Dustin isn't saying don't get art skills, he's saying as far as keeping yourself relevant in the workplace it's best to know as much as possible, especially when it comes to new tools. If a studio adopts Mari, and you know it you're instantly that much better off for that, and if you don't, even if you're an awesome artist, you'll have to learn it. So given two otherwise equal canditates, the one that knows Mari is better off than the one that doesn't, and yes, IMO sticking to photoshop and Max is tremendously foolish. In a studio space art becomes quantitative, not just qualitative, it's all about being able to do the most with the least amount of time, and no amount traditional art skills are going to work you into a studios pipeline any easier than knowing a wide berth of software is. And by the by, It's not a matter of traditional mediums vs contemporary ones, It's a matter of the same skills being relevant in both instances, take anyone learning anatomical form and give them some paper a pencil and some clay, or photoshop and Zbrush, because as tools for that the relevance is essentially negligible. So while what you're saying holds truth, it's not really relevant in argument to Dustin's point.

    He was auguring that anyone that didn't learn the listed software would be extinct which is why I compared traditional to digital art saying that traditional was still around despite digital art emerging.

    I already said above that learning new software was good, but saying that someone creating art is extinct because the're not using the new tool becomes available, is wrong.
    DKK wrote: »
    But anything takes a learning period right Justin? It's the same argument as Oil paints vs Charcoal isn't it? One does not necessarily mean you can do the other, But if hypothetically a place existed to churn out illustrations in oil paint, if you were just as good an artist as someone else, but had no ability or knowledge of how oil paints worked, would the someone else win out? The point is not don't learn art, it's do learn as many tools as possible because it makes working professionally that much easier for you.

    It's about learning the fundamentals of art, once you get that down using a paintbrush, charcoal or digital shouldn't really matter. Trying to learn art in combination with learning software is just making things more complex for you.
  • almighty_gir
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    almighty_gir ngon master
    Ark wrote: »
    Yeah because traditional art died out as well when digital art emerged. :P

    There still pretty much situational tools, not gonna replace Photoshop or Max/Maya

    Absolute horse shit...

    this is probably the most irrelevant argument there is! art is art, there is no classic vs digital. it's all art.

    nowadays, max/maya are more situational than the other tools available. the only place max has in my workflow now is retopo and uvmapping, and both of those things i could do elsewhere. it's become possible to do 99% of your work in zbrush, if you can get good results out of their texturing tools. if you can't, then use mari. the actual NEED for programs like max/maya/photoshop is becoming smaller and smaller with every new iteration of these other programs.

    to say that software like marvelous designer or substance designer are "situational" is just downright ignorant. marvelous designer is a powerful cloth simulator... it's not just a character artist tool, it can and has been used by environment artists too... and it speeds up workflows immeasurably. substance designer and Ddo speed up texturing workflows to no end... and the day those softwares become integrated into software like Mari (you know it'll happen sooner or later), you can practically say goodbye to photoshop for texturing all together at that point.


    now, i realise that CURRENTLY studios who focus on mobile gaming probably don't have much need for those programs right now, but the mobile platform is becoming more and more powerful tech wise, it won't be too long before we start to see "AAA like" games on mobile, where these softwares will cut dev time by a lot.

    every time i see someone say "oh no, i can live with my classic workflow and art skills", all i can think is "absolutely, but for how long?"
  • Ark
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    Ark polycounter lvl 11
    Absolute horse shit...

    this is probably the most irrelevant argument there is! art is art, there is no classic vs digital. it's all art.

    nowadays, max/maya are more situational than the other tools available. the only place max has in my workflow now is retopo and uvmapping, and both of those things i could do elsewhere. it's become possible to do 99% of your work in zbrush, if you can get good results out of their texturing tools. if you can't, then use mari. the actual NEED for programs like max/maya/photoshop is becoming smaller and smaller with every new iteration of these other programs.

    to say that software like marvelous designer or substance designer are "situational" is just downright ignorant. marvelous designer is a powerful cloth simulator... it's not just a character artist tool, it can and has been used by environment artists too... and it speeds up workflows immeasurably. substance designer and Ddo speed up texturing workflows to no end... and the day those softwares become integrated into software like Mari (you know it'll happen sooner or later), you can practically say goodbye to photoshop for texturing all together at that point.


    now, i realise that CURRENTLY studios who focus on mobile gaming probably don't have much need for those programs right now, but the mobile platform is becoming more and more powerful tech wise, it won't be too long before we start to see "AAA like" games on mobile, where these softwares will cut dev time by a lot.

    every time i see someone say "oh no, i can live with my classic workflow and art skills", all i can think is "absolutely, but for how long?"

    You still can't animate, composite, track and render in these programs. Like I said Max/Maya have a much broader toolset.

    Mari and SD are focused on a set area of the pipeline.

    If Max and Maya are more situational than Mari and SD, then try getting a fully animated character or environment in a game engine just using Mari and SD.
  • SHEPEIRO
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    SHEPEIRO polycounter lvl 13
    i think more to a point.

    STUDIOS WONT BE ABLE TO SURVIVE WITHOUT ADOPTING TOOLS LIKE THESE.

    not all studios but alot for sure, traditional methods can achieve as good or better results but time costs too much and projects are scaling exponentially

    its smart to use tools like this but they are still at the point where you can get ahead by having knowledge you dont need it.....

    yet.

    ark - you jumped on his statement way too abruptly "Anyone who resists new tools like Mari, Substance Designer, Marvelous Designer, etc is going to quickly find themselves extinct" NOT "He was auguring that anyone that didn't learn the listed software would be extinct" important word being LIKE

    also they are situational now... but i think they wont be pretty soon... material definition is so important and things are becoming industry standard very quickly that were not dreamed of at the beginning of at the beginning of the current gen


    also who do you know that still models by typing in co-ordinates?
  • Ark
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    Ark polycounter lvl 11
    SHEPEIRO wrote: »
    i think more to a point.

    STUDIOS WONT BE ABLE TO SURVIVE WITHOUT ADOPTING TOOLS LIKE THESE.

    not all studios but alot for sure, traditional methods can achieve as good or better results but time costs too much and projects are scaling exponentially

    its smart to use tools like this but they are still at the point where you can get ahead by having knowledge you dont need it.....

    yet.

    ark - you jumped on his statement way too abruptly "Anyone who resists new tools like Mari, Substance Designer, Marvelous Designer, etc is going to quickly find themselves extinct" NOT "He was auguring that anyone that didn't learn the listed software would be extinct" important word being LIKE

    also they are situational now... but i think they wont be pretty soon... material definition is so important and things are becoming industry standard very quickly that were not dreamed of at the beginning of at the beginning of the current gen


    also who do you know that still models by typing in co-ordinates?

    Maybe I did jump too abruptly, I didn't mean to be pointing a finger, but if that's what it came off has then I apologise, but using words like "Extinct" was maybe the wrong choice of word on his part?
    Just because some new tool is released doesn't make it's predecessor extinct. Sure it's viable and good to learn the new software, but all pipelines are based around a strong all-rounder CG package.

    People actually modelled typing in co-ordinates? That sounds awesome, but Michelangelo painted with a paintbrush and the same brushes are used today.
  • SHEPEIRO
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    SHEPEIRO polycounter lvl 13
    Yeah but paintbrushes have a distinct physicality that cannot be replicated. Someone's material setup in max can be exactly

    What I'm trying to say is we keep hold of ancient tools that will forever give certain properties that can't be superseded. Our current set of industry packages can and will be superseded. Don't bury your head in the sand ;-)
  • Ark
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    Ark polycounter lvl 11
    I'm not turning me head away from what's in the future and incoming, I already said that multiple times in my previous posts. Also already stated that these programs that are focused on doing one thing well will not replace a full all-rounder CG package.
    Max and Maya or some other core 3D package will always be the hub.
  • Alberto Rdrgz
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    Alberto Rdrgz polycounter lvl 9
    Desperad0 wrote: »
    I am starting to feel like I'm being taught and learning to use a texturing program that is not used much at all. How much is The Foundry Mari used out there? Is texturing with Mari a lot different than texturing in Photoshop? Because with Mari, I don't have to think about seams much, a mindset that could be a problem when I have to switch to texture with Photoshop.


    yup, our prop and character texture artists use it regularly, for masks, clr maps, and flow maps. and all sorts of other maps.
  • Justin Meisse
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    Justin Meisse polycounter lvl 17
    it won't be too long before we start to see "AAA like" games on mobile, where these softwares will cut dev time by a lot.

    every time i see someone say "oh no, i can live with my classic workflow and art skills", all i can think is "absolutely, but for how long?"

    If you can show me tools that let me make a AAA fancy pants character in the same timeframe as lowpoly stuff - about 2-3 days, then I'll hop on it. It's the weeks working on one asset that turns me off of AAA the most.
  • almighty_gir
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    almighty_gir ngon master
    If you can show me tools that let me make a AAA fancy pants character in the same timeframe as lowpoly stuff - about 2-3 days, then I'll hop on it. It's the weeks working on one asset that turns me off of AAA the most.

    there's nothing that good, YET.

    but that's what i was saying, how long will it be before the tools allow that kind of turn around? especially now that you can take a 3d scan, cleanup, zremesher, cleanup, uvmap, done.

    the two cleanup passes don't even take all that long in most cases, as 3d scanning tech gets better.

    the point i was trying to make, is that all of these tech advances either speed up, or remove portions of time that artists spend doing tasks that are detrimental to their workflow. not embracing them is like saying you love doing everything the long way.
  • almighty_gir
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    almighty_gir ngon master
    DKK wrote: »
    And just where did that get him? He's dead... Michelangelo is literally extinct. So doubtful the dude is gonna get a job at Naughty dog.

    Can I also just say that if someone uses the word "Extinct" I'm naturally inclined to assume they're using a fancy little literary tool called hyperbole It's an element of sarcasm just fyi... So in this case I assume that Dustin was sarcastically joking that people should make sure to stay up to date on technology so that they don't end up missing out on job opportunities.

    also this.

    you never know when the nest you're living in will fall out from underneath you and you're forced to find alternate working opportunities. and you will lose out on a job over someone else with equal artistic merit if they're up to date on tech.
  • SHEPEIRO
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    SHEPEIRO polycounter lvl 13
    talking very generally, and with only my personal reflections.. nothing but my feelings and experiences to back it up

    artists generally love their craft... that means they enjoy the process, so will always mourn the loss of need for techniques painstakingly learnt and mastered. You will cling onto them as long as they can for good reason, if you spend alot of effort into something you want to get the most out of it.

    but its as much about what makes your work pleasurable, most artists enjoy the fact that things are painstakingly hand painted etc etc, as it makes them more of an artist and less of a technician.

    but all that ignores what is/will be generally commercially viable. videogames are heading for a crisis IMO where the escalating production costs outweigh the difference they make to the consumer and any tool like these becomes extremely important to bridging that gap
  • artquest
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    artquest polycounter lvl 10
    If you can show me tools that let me make a AAA fancy pants character in the same timeframe as lowpoly stuff - about 2-3 days, then I'll hop on it. It's the weeks working on one asset that turns me off of AAA the most.

    We're getting there but not quite 2-3 day turn arounds yet. But I do think we're getting pretty close to that point. The latest Zbrush Z-remesher lets you create your lowpoly in a matter of minutes after you have your high rez done. It's amazing!

    For texturing in next gen I think it's going to be a lot of material library assignments in the engine and then painting the wear and tear on it quickly with masks and such. We'll see it move towards almost being like prop fabrication on movie sets where you figure out creative ways to ding and dent your assets to give them a story.

    The more mari gets integrated with games I think it will really start to take off. For any kind of higher detailed stuff with baked normal maps and spec it works great. But so far for low poly diffuse only I still use 3D coat.

    The sins art dump link in my sig has some examples of Mari for games. That being said, the game models had to be used to make the cinematic. Which was the reason why I jumped on mari. If it was more of a stylized lowpoly project probably wouldn't have used it. Mari makes creating crazy detail very fast and efficient. Which makes perfect sense considering what it was developed for.


    On a side note, I loved painting the sky-boxes for sins in mari. absolutely a blast. I never had to worry about seams and I could just paint on a decent rez sphere and see all of the focal points in context.
  • jgreasley
    Ruz wrote: »
    I found it incredibly slow , so gave it a miss

    Could you let me know what GPU / Driver version you have? Thanks.
  • jgreasley
    Thanks for all of the comments about Mari!

    We're actively looking for feedback from the games community about how we can improve Mari so all of this is incredibly useful.
  • Desperad0
    Even for our school computers it's easy for Mari to lag and freeze and crash. These machines have Intel(R) Xeon(R) 3.33GHz CPU, 8GB RAM with 64-bit Win7 Enterprise.
  • MM
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    MM polycounter lvl 16
    Desperad0 wrote: »
    These machines have Intel(R) Xeon(R) 3.33GHz CPU, 8GB RAM with 64-bit Win7 Enterprise.

    what is more important is a powerful GPU for Mari. what GPU do they have ?
    from my experience it wasnt as slow as some are saying.

    also, 8GB ram is actually quite low considering windows7 on idle eats away 3-4gb by itself leaving you only ~4gb for other apps and rest is virtual memory and i doubt your schools has even set up proper page file disks for virtual memory.
  • jgreasley
    Desperad0 wrote: »
    Even for our school computers it's easy for Mari to lag and freeze and crash. These machines have Intel(R) Xeon(R) 3.33GHz CPU, 8GB RAM with 64-bit Win7 Enterprise.

    It's essential to have the latest stable drivers for your GPU installed. We tend to find (and get fixed) a large number of driver bugs.

    8GB (at least under Linux) should be fine. Large parts of Avatar were done on 8GB-12GB machines.
  • Zpanzer
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    Zpanzer polycounter lvl 8
    jgreasley wrote: »
    It's essential to have the latest stable drivers for your GPU installed. We tend to find (and get fixed) a large number of driver bugs.

    8GB (at least under Linux) should be fine. Large parts of Avatar were done on 8GB-12GB machines.

    If I'm not mistaken, Mari needs a good chunk of GPU memory when dealing with large/many textures.
  • PolyHertz
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    PolyHertz hero character
    Mari is quite slow depending on what you're doing; Like try and select a UV shell (smart selection mode + face selection mode), if the shell is even somewhat highpoly it can take ages.

    I've only used Mari a little bit but found the UI to be terribly unintuitive and cluttered. Had problems doing even basic things like flood fill or importing PSDs, and there's no decent training materials I've run across focused on game artists either for the current version.
  • Irreal
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    Irreal polycounter lvl 10
    jgreasley - It would be really useful if you could give more time to evaluate the software. I may only get a few hours a week to try out new stuff at work and 15 days just isn't long enough.
  • Desperad0
    MM wrote: »
    what is more important is a powerful GPU for Mari. what GPU do they have ?
    from my experience it wasnt as slow as some are saying.

    also, 8GB ram is actually quite low considering windows7 on idle eats away 3-4gb by itself leaving you only ~4gb for other apps and rest is virtual memory and i doubt your schools has even set up proper page file disks for virtual memory.

    I can't seem to access info for GPU on these computers.
  • ArYeS
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    ArYeS polycounter lvl 8
    We actually use Mari even for low-poly stuff (mobile platform). You can't use all it's advantages while doing so, but it's a nice tool to work with.

    It doesn't really support non-square textures to my knowledge, which is a pity, but you still can get around that by using squares - higher resolution and then squashing down and doing some sharpening.

    It doesn't really makes sense for lowpoly art, because you have to have expensive GPU too run Mari well. Few of our artist have 32gb ram/i7/SSD rigs, because they use PCs for Nuke as well. So there is really not a problem, but otherwise investing in machines like that only for low-poly it doesn't balance out.

    Our artist love it, me as tech artist haven't got chance to go into scripting and shader-writing, because there was no need too, but i would strongly recommend looking into Mari for VFX/Movie/Beauty production.
  • jgreasley
    Zpanzer wrote: »
    If I'm not mistaken, Mari needs a good chunk of GPU memory when dealing with large/many textures.

    Mari uses a virtual texturing system (like ID tech 5) and has a fixed Memory footprint for normal textures. 1gb of Ram should be able to cope with many 10s of Gbs of textures.

    Mari does use extra GPU ram for live tiling and projection textures, you can however cache these to manage memory effectively.
  • marks
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    marks greentooth
    Irreal wrote: »
    jgreasley - It would be really useful if you could give more time to evaluate the software. I may only get a few hours a week to try out new stuff at work and 15 days just isn't long enough.

    I have to agree with this, 30 days seems pretty standard for most software but I think even that is a little on the short side to become familiar with a new app, and for it to prove its worth in a production context.
  • jgreasley
    Irreal wrote: »
    jgreasley - It would be really useful if you could give more time to evaluate the software. I may only get a few hours a week to try out new stuff at work and 15 days just isn't long enough.

    I'll certainly let people know about your request for a longer standard eval.

    If you drop me an email at [email protected] I can sort you out with a longer eval.
  • almighty_gir
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    almighty_gir ngon master
    have you considered starting up a student edition, allowing universities to start adopting it?

    that's probably one of the biggest reasons for uptake of Autodesk products vs anything else at this point. it's like smoking... we all know it's bad for you, but they get to you early enough that you struggle to break the habit!
  • Desperad0
    My school's using/teaching it. Once I graduate, I probably won't get to use it again, which is why I also asked the OP question, because I want to keep using, and know it and get better at it even though it's so heavy for the computers.
  • jgreasley
    Desperad0, Do you think you could provide a Mari archive of one of your projects for us to check?

    I'd like to know what might be making this run slowly.

    Thanks
  • Desperad0
    jgreasley wrote: »
    Desperad0, Do you think you could provide a Mari archive of one of your projects for us to check?

    I'd like to know what might be making this run slowly.

    Thanks

    How can I do that? The archive is 600+MB, and even DropBox doesn't accept upload that big.

    I think it's just our classroom computers' built, because everyone in the class who textures with Mari came to understand that we'd better save-a-lot, and not have other programs running at the same time. Only mp3 or movie.
  • jgreasley
    Desperad0 wrote: »
    How can I do that? The archive is 600+MB, and even DropBox doesn't accept upload that big.

    I think it's just our classroom computers' built, because everyone in the class who textures with Mari came to understand that we'd better save-a-lot, and not have other programs running at the same time. Only mp3 or movie.

    I can setup an FTP account at the foundry for you. That will take 600+MB without any problems.

    Also a log file from a sessions will help us work out what GPUs and driver versions you're using.

    The log can be found in C:/Users/<your account>/Mari/Logs/MariLog.txt

    The log would probably be more use than the archive at the moment and you should be able to attach that to an email.

    If you can send the log to [email protected] that would be great.

    Thanks
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