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A question regarding the ideal work flow for texturing buildings in Dayz and Arma3.

(i made a new account but im actually a shy polycounter of several years and I know how to model etc.)

after a long break away from modeling I'm planning on making some buildings for Dayz. (i tagged Arma3 in this because it seems a lot of the workflow is identical but somethings are different and this post could help arma people etc)

Currently the only problem is getting hold of enough information about the best workflow for texturing the models I intend to make.

I dont intend to do the porting, other people will do that, but i have to provide them with models in a game ready state, this includes the LOD models, as well as the hit boxes etc ( there are few other meshes, similar to hit boxes, for ai and things like that I wont go into that here.)

a lot of the modders/modellers I've spoken to online all have really varying levels of advice, and I've found the various online groups for discussing modding dayz very mixed in their views, some aren't fussed about the file sizes.

also sometimes those communities aren't too nice, if I ask the same question twice, on different communities, i will often receive a dm from someone scolding me for asking a question twice. etc. and I've found that a bit stressful to deal with, especially when you want to provide that community with free labor.

for example with my own experience with 3d environment/building texturing, I started off texturing scenes for architectural renders, which involved applying tiled textures in Google Sketchup to my bosses' models. size wasnt an issue for this and I could have a folder full of loads of 512 textures.

then I moved on making game assets, using tiled trim sheets and striving to squeeze as much visual data on to a 1k atlas map.


how many shaders/materials can  I give to an object?

now with Dayz, I can't find a clear answer from people regarding how to compile the visual data, how many maps/trim sheets, should a building have? (an ideal number)

do I need to produce mip maps? or does the engine generate those?

would you go with 2k or 4k? (someone told me the buildings they have made use loads of 4k tiled textures ! thats not trim sheets, thats loads of individual textures at 4k, which seems a bit absurd waste of memory or a bit amateur.)

How many uv maps can the models allow? is there a particular naming convention etc?



once i know this stuff, I can actually move on and make something, (speaking for myself) there is no point making anything until I know how it will be uv mapped so I know if it has parts which I will bake etc.

Replies

  • Ghogiel
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    Ghogiel greentooth
    Most of your questions rely on knowing what the environment you are building is, profiling/testing in the engine, limitations of the shaders/engine. You're probably not going to like the answers from here because I'd guess polycount collectively knows even less about the engine than those dedicated modding communities :# .

    Use as few materials/trims as possible, the limit is going to be for the whole scene wih game conditions in engine, which no one knows, so nothing more specific can be said. You kinda need to have a real good look at existing levels, do some testing, and be prepared to make some optimisations if needed.
  • odduy77
    Ghogiel said:
    Most of your questions rely on knowing what the environment you are building is, profiling/testing in the engine, limitations of the shaders/engine. You're probably not going to like the answers from here because I'd guess polycount collectively knows even less about the engine than those dedicated modding communities :# .

    Use as few materials/trims as possible, the limit is going to be for the whole scene wih game conditions in engine, which no one knows, so nothing more specific can be said. You kinda need to have a real good look at existing levels, do some testing, and be prepared to make some optimisations if needed.

    i just had a message from someone elsewhere saying that the object they made had 7 different materials/shaders! no idea if thats what the engine was designed for, but it definately seems to go in the face to the usual stuff we get taught at polycount and in the cg community.

    also, currently I can't test out the models (Arma and Dayz have a thing called a p drive for stuff like this) because I'm actually without a gaming pc at the moment and im doing everything on a tablet.
  • Ghogiel
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    Ghogiel greentooth
    I take back what I was saying about polycount not knowing as much about that engine....
  • sacboi
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    sacboi polycount lvl 666
    Cheers, thanks for sharing your insight Frank, as an ex-player come wannabe modder of the game.
  • gnoop
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    gnoop interpolator
    There's a lot to unpack here...

    One of the reasons mod projects fail is most people just want to do the cool creative stuff
    For some reason all game companies I ever worked for  never  cared too much  for making something  simple and easy, and as much automatic  as possible   to do all that  game mechanics stuff.

    I recall writing and editing  long  special scripts  and then wasting hours trying to figure out what went wrong,    dealing with super crashy  and super user unfriendly  in house tools or even writing lengthy "objects properties" and viewing distances  in 3d max for one mobile game.

    My guess it's lots of expensive programmers time  vs cheap artists one and never a priority. 
     
    Even Unreal which is way ahead of anything in that regard is not a  great User Experience  achievement  IMO.







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