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Going to Gnomon while 100% remote?

I've just discovered the school and it seems worthwhile for most people who apply themselves. But right now, it's fully remote, and they haven't decreased the tuition (still ~80k to go there on average I think). Is it worth it to try to get admitted right now? Is anyone there currently? How important is on-campus at a school like this? 

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  • Brian "Panda" Choi
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    Brian "Panda" Choi high dynamic range
    I don't think school is worth it when you can't meet in person, and they haven't changed the price of it.

    Coming from someone who went to USC.

    Do you have a portfolio already?
  • jollyhohnson
    @Brian"Panda"Choi I do! I was hoping to speak with an advisor and show them the pdf I put together. I went to UCSD for visual arts but the program was highly theoretical and did not teach me any marketable skills. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Ashervisalis
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    Ashervisalis godlike master sticky
    If you show your portfolio to an advisor, they won't tell you if you're good enough to get a job, they'll just tell you that you're good enough to get into the school to give em money.

    I just checked out your portfolio, I believe you're a little too good to spent $80k on schooling. Just keep making as much art as you can and applying to jobs. I'd suggest working on your texturing skills, and focusing on either characters or environments (I like your characters a lot!)
  • sacboi
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    sacboi insane polycounter
    I concur.

    And for what its worth commenting as a hard surface/weapons artist, your stylized chars look good so no need to then hand over 80k for Gnomon too otherwise re-affirm that.
  • jollyhohnson
    @Ashervisalis thank you for the kind words! Just a little background on me - I went to a UC school and the art program was underfunded and too theoretical/contemporary. So I taught myself the basics of graphic design. After that I discovered Maya. I took some classes at Animschool, and I feel that they really improved my eye for things, and my style is very "cute" I'd say... But I cannot find a job, because I'm not technically knowledgeable enough. I have no training on the development pipeline, any texture work, and I have no experience in the professional 3D environment. Nearly had a position at Snap inc but they said no since my experience on 3D teams was next to none. So I'm wondering if Gnomon is the school for me for those reasons. 

    TLDR; I'm simply undereducated on the technical and production pipeline side of things, and I'm kicking myself/considering going back to school to be a master, or at least try to. 

    But truly thank you for the advice. I have a lot to think about. 
  • Ashervisalis
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    Ashervisalis godlike master sticky
    Take a few online courses on texturing stylized characters, make sure your topology looks like the topology for a professionally made character. That's all you really need right now, and then just keep banging out dope art. Everybody gets continually rejected at the beginning of their 3D career. You might keep getting rejected for a while; this is the industry. Fight the urge to spend that $80k, you'll regret it. There are a lot of tutorials for cheap, if not free, online, and you'll save yourself so much money or debt.

    I'd highly recommend posting your portfolio in the 3d art section of this forum, or on the Polycount Slack, and asking for a portfolio review. People will then tell you what you're lacking, and then it just takes work on your half to fill out those lacking skills.
  • jollyhohnson
    @Ashervisalis I will definitely post my portfolio in those places. I will keep all this in mind... Thanks so much! :) 
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
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    Brian "Panda" Choi high dynamic range
    Yea, your art sensibility is already there that I think you could solo learn pretty decently.  Portfolio is definitely already better than what I'd expect a new student to have.

    The struggle is going to be getting access to technical knowledge and related things relatively quickly.  It's surmountable, but times are weird.

    You know what, if you're comfortable with it, I'd be down to jump on a call with you to give you ideas on how to get more production experience. I was in a similar-ish position, and worked with artists in the same position while a uni student.  Feel free to email me.  
  • poopipe
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    poopipe godlike master sticky


    TLDR; I'm simply undereducated on the technical and production pipeline side of things, and I'm kicking myself/considering going back to school to be a master, or at least try to. 


    I worked with a gnomon grad a while back.  He was a very talented individual but didn't have any more working production knowledge than grads from other half decent courses. Not to say it's not a great course but none of them really prepare you for actual work. 


    dae at howest would be my recommendation if you want a production focused course but really the only way to learn this stuff is to go out and work.
  • Larry
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    Larry interpolator
    @Ashervisalis thank you for the kind words! Just a little background on me - I went to a UC school and the art program was underfunded and too theoretical/contemporary. So I taught myself the basics of graphic design. After that I discovered Maya. I took some classes at Animschool, and I feel that they really improved my eye for things, and my style is very "cute" I'd say... But I cannot find a job, because I'm not technically knowledgeable enough. I have no training on the development pipeline, any texture work, and I have no experience in the professional 3D environment. Nearly had a position at Snap inc but they said no since my experience on 3D teams was next to none. So I'm wondering if Gnomon is the school for me for those reasons. 

    TLDR; I'm simply undereducated on the technical and production pipeline side of things, and I'm kicking myself/considering going back to school to be a master, or at least try to. 

    But truly thank you for the advice. I have a lot to think about. 
    Pluralsight will give you all the pipelines you need with 30 dollars per month. Don't waste 80k...
  • birb
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    birb interpolator
    Also, a hit-or-miss approach to start to get a grip on pipelines and working professionally in general that won't cost you anything other than time and effort:

    Game Jams
    The current circumstances made some move online and even open up to international participants. You'll get to watch presentations specifically geared towards game dev and production, network and get a first taste of what it feels like to be part of a team—during crunch time, sure, but hey, this is also an useful experience!

    Collaborations and Rev-Shares
    Choose wisely and you may find something that won't take long, will get your feet wet in working in a production environment and generate potential portfolio material, to not speak about the potential to make a little money.

    Freelancing
    This one won't teach about pipelines or working in a team, but picking small freelance jobs will help to hone your "professional mode". Communication skills, setting and enforcing deadlines, extracting briefings from clients, putting good presentations together, selling your abilities to someone and even learning to spot problematic jobs / fire clients are some of the skills you can pick up by freelancing.
  • jollyhohnson
    Thank you everyone for the advice, it's been super helpful. @Brian "Panda" Choi thank you so much for the offer for a call. I'll definitely be emailing you soon!
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