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Substance Painter - Normal Seam Issue - UV size?

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Hi,
Apologies if I am going about this the wrong way, I've been hunting around for an explanation but have not been able to find any:

I've noticed that when baking a simple cube in Substance Painter I get a minor line going down the hard edge. I expected this to be smooth as I've used:
  • average normals in the bake (Substance Painter)
  • Separate UV islands for each side of cube (Maya)
  • Hard edges on all edges of the cube (Maya)


I've noticed that when increasing the size of the UVs in the 0-1 space, it fixes the problem:


So I have a couple of questions;

  • Is there a way to solve this without increasing the UV size - UV space is tight as this is part of a larger asset
  • Since its not overly noticeable, should I even be concerned? Could there be issues further down the pipeline? (or am I being obsessive?)

Thanks in advance :)


Replies

  • rollin
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    rollin polycounter
    Hi, what texel density we're talking about? Might be a bleeding issue
  • Obscura
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    Obscura godlike master sticky
    I don't think you should be concerned much, I can barely see the error and I'm probably not alone with this.
  • LaughinTea
    rollin said:
    Hi, what texel density we're talking about? Might be a bleeding issue
    Hey, so I've been working with 2k in Substance Painter. Yeah I think it could be a pixel issue since the sizing of the UV seems to help. But I thought that at this resolution, even with small UV shells, I shouldn't be seeing any issues?
  • LaughinTea
    Obscura said:
    I don't think you should be concerned much, I can barely see the error and I'm probably not alone with this.
    Hey, yeah you are probably right, my concern is just when it happens on bigger more important areas of the mesh. But like you say, its difficult to see and probably can be hidden by applying materials etc to it. I just like to understand whats actually going on :)
  • rollin
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    rollin polycounter
    rollin said:
    Hi, what texel density we're talking about? Might be a bleeding issue
    Hey, so I've been working with 2k in Substance Painter. Yeah I think it could be a pixel issue since the sizing of the UV seems to help. But I thought that at this resolution, even with small UV shells, I shouldn't be seeing any issues?
    It depends on the texel density. A 2k texture doesn't say anything without knowing the uv-space of the element.
  • LaughinTea
    rollin said:
    rollin said:
    Hi, what texel density we're talking about? Might be a bleeding issue
    Hey, so I've been working with 2k in Substance Painter. Yeah I think it could be a pixel issue since the sizing of the UV seems to help. But I thought that at this resolution, even with small UV shells, I shouldn't be seeing any issues?
    It depends on the texel density. A 2k texture doesn't say anything without knowing the uv-space of the element.
    Oh right sorry, how would I know the exact texel density? I've only been basing it on maximising the UV space. Using Maya 2019 UV tool 'Get average texel density from faces' gives me between 6 & 7 px/unit
  • poopipe
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    poopipe polycount lvl 666
    That was pure poetry

    Gold star for you
  • rollin
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    rollin polycounter
    @Thanez
    I deeply thank you for .. this!  :heart:

  • LaughinTea
    @Thanez - thanks! Very descriptive and yes I see your point. Yup, its pretty much invisible with textures added! Good to know all that though so thanks everyone!
  • annebakerim
    Your bit rate is too low. So you bake it to a 32768*32768 32bit image, taking up 4GB of VRAM, but then you zoom so close that you'll be able to see the difference between 44,995° and 45°,http://bakerim.com/ and that's when you realize both that you've gone mad, and the fact that when you separate two planes by a hard edge and a split in the UVs you also break any and all interpolation between the two planes' shading and their respective pixels. If you zoom close enough, you'll be able to see it
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