Help Cut My Portfolio!

GuanAndOnly
polycounter lvl 2
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GuanAndOnly polycounter lvl 2
Hey guys, I was wondering if y'all can help me cut the fat from my portfolio. I'm not quite sure what to keep and what to toss, and I'm graduating in a year so I'm kinda getting worried. I'm hoping to completely replace my portfolio by the time I graduate, but it'd be nice to know which ones to replace immediately, and which ones I can leave on for a while until I make something better.

https://www.artstation.com/artist/guanandonly
I know it's nothing special, especially compared to the stuff on Polycount, but it would be nice to have new eyes rip my anus apart. :>

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  • TeriyakiStyle
  • GuanAndOnly
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    GuanAndOnly polycounter lvl 2






    Oh shit mb forgot to take out some of my illustration stuff, forgot I added a bunch of stuff while applying for co-op.
    Other than that though, is 2D work a deficit? All the interviews I had for my work term referred to my traditional drawings and even during my co-op term my employer referred to my drawings. :<
  • TeriyakiStyle
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    TeriyakiStyle ngon master
    people will debate that - if I were hiring you for 3d artist I wouldn't care about your drawings (sorry!).  If you want to have drawings include them in your 3d process to show how you work and figure out things towards a 3d end product.  It's great to see someone can sketch ideas clearly because you are always doing that on paper or whiteboards in meetings. drapery or charcoal studies - meh
  • Elithenia
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    Elithenia polycounter lvl 2
    What @TeriyakiStyle is saying is what we tell students as well at our university. It is great that you have knowledge about the 2d as well as the 3d. But in your portfolio you should only show the stuff that you want to get hired for. 
    Since you put that you're a 3d Environment and Prop artist, that is what you should have in your portfolio. All else that you might want to show -> put them in a blog or something that you can refer to. Otherwise work it into your progress shots and overall workflow.

    It is great to have skills outside of what you want to work with, however showing them in the portfolio might just dilute the potential effect your other work might have on an employer. 
  • GuanAndOnly
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    GuanAndOnly polycounter lvl 2
    Ah, I see. Thanks for the help guys. C:
    During my co op term I was more worried about /landing/ a job as opposed to the type of job I want, but I see how it'll be different when I graduate.
    As for the title, I personally am not too fixated on props/enviro, rather I'm just not comfortable with characters (but I like texturing :c). Would it be a bad idea to write "generalist"?
    Lastly (sorry for the questions) of the stuff I have in the 3D section are there any that seem a lot weaker than the rest? 
    Once again, thanks for taking the time to respond, guys. C:
  • Elithenia
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    Elithenia polycounter lvl 2
    As for a generalist, you will have to know about the entire pipeline basically. You'll do rigging, animation, modelling, lighting ... basically anything that can be thrown your way. It is a tough thing, where you will have to know a bit about everything in order to work. It is great for smaller studios, however I don't see many of the big studios advertising for generalists.  Google talks about it, I know there's been a few at Gnomon where they have talked about generalist vs specialist. Interesting to listen to. 

    As you are set on replacing your entire portfolio before you graduate I would say focus on doing the best work you can with the new pieces, no matter what style you go for, instead of focusing on what you have right now. 
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