On gaming versus other CG industries

polycounter lvl 7
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huffer polycounter lvl 7
I have an opportunity to leave an alright-paying job as a CGI artist (advertising stills) for an equally alright-paying job in the gaming industry as a 3D artist.

What do you guys think, where do you have a bigger chance to develop your skills, or get more exposure?

In advertising there are more parts: an agency that comes up with the pitch, photographers, and post-production work - what you create is a smaller part of the whole, even by itself it's edited.

As a 3D artist I could create something that will appear in-game exactly as I finished it (well almost), and close to perfection as I see it, and it could be more rewarding. A a creator, there's a lot of times in commercial CGI where you outsource parts, mix and match them, cheat in some ways (since you need a rendering in the end) and you don't actually make it yourself.

On the other hand, advertising stills are everywhere and they even get prestigious awards, plus give credit to the artist that worked on them.

Do you think you narrow down your skillset if you step into the gaming industry?

How do you see the future? The gaming industry booming with titles getting millions or sales or ads are a better option in the long run, as a first step into VFX or movies?

Replies

  • JordanN
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    JordanN greentooth
    Gaming is more fun. To me, there's no bigger hype than when a new console or game is announced. But you have to put up with crunch time.

    CG I imagine is probably more laid back. Don't most movies take many years to make? They never seem to be in hurry to rush things.
  • Meteora
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    Meteora polycounter lvl 5
    The game industry is more "fun" since you're much more likely to be invested into your project. But because of the investment, you might become disappointed when a game doesn't end up doing as well as you and your colleagues may like. And unlike advertisement I would have to imagine job security is much less secure than having a steady flow of clients in the advertisement industry, as the performance of the game and sales dictates the success of the studio.

    I wouldn't know about chance of developing your skills in either industries.
  • ExcessiveZero
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    ExcessiveZero polycounter lvl 5
    Meteora wrote: »
    The game industry is more "fun" since you're much more likely to be invested into your project. But because of the investment, you might become disappointed when a game doesn't end up doing as well as you and your colleagues may like. And unlike advertisement I would have to imagine job security is much less secure than having a steady flow of clients in the advertisement industry, as the performance of the game and sales dictates the success of the studio.

    I wouldn't know about chance of developing your skills in either industries.
    I always work on a game expecting its going to flop, my reward is that when its done I get to move onto the next game.

    some may see this as a negative attitude, which I may have to begin with, but this works for me because if I gave up in favour of a better idea I have likely had for the next game I would never finish anything.
  • stabbington
    JordanN wrote: »
    CG I imagine is probably more laid back. Don't most movies take many years to make? They never seem to be in hurry to rush things.

    Crunch is just as bad in the other CG industries I've worked in; advertising and TV work is especially bad, as it's one crazily short race to meet one hectic deadline after another, and TV VFX notoriously underpays, so you get even less time allotted to make things look good.

    In the big VFX houses it's not uncommon to have to work until 10 at night or over the weekend to make sure your shots are in on time for review and meet the standards for approval. Although, some disciplines do seem to get a bit of time to sit about (animators waiting for shot approval, sim crews waiting for the farms to return previews, etc.)
  • Decoyz
    Crunch is just as bad in the other CG industries I've worked in; advertising and TV work is especially bad, as it's one crazily short race to meet one hectic deadline after another, and TV VFX notoriously underpays, so you get even less time allotted to make things look good.

    In the big VFX houses it's not uncommon to have to work until 10 at night or over the weekend to make sure your shots are in on time for review and meet the standards for approval. Although, some disciplines do seem to get a bit of time to sit about (animators waiting for shot approval, sim crews waiting for the farms to return previews, etc.)

    +1 on this. I'm actually trying to learn what I need to know to switch careers from vfx to the gaming indusry. And it just seems like it's going to get worse. Just look at what happened to Rhythm & Hues for example.
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