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UV mapping techniques

I think I spend a lot of time on uv mapping. do you guys have any tips to speed things up?

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  • kio
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    kio polycounter lvl 15
    do even more uv mapping? :)
  • MoP
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    MoP polycounter lvl 18
    Set up hotkeys or right-click menu commands for stuff you do a lot.
    I recommend hotkeying these ( Max / Maya ):
    - Relax / Unfold, and Relax
    - Break / Cut UVs
    - Weld / Merge UVs
    - Stitch / Move & Sew
    - Quick Planar Map (for face selections)

    Having hotkeys for aligning horizontally/vertically is also good, as is mirroring/flipping or offsetting UVs.

    Beyond that, what kio said ;)
  • Baddcog
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    Baddcog polycounter lvl 9
    I break everything up into chuncks now days.

    If a part is cylindrical, off it comes to be uv'ed cylindrically on it's own.

    If there are multiple parts that are the same I will uv one, add uv unwrap (move it out of the way/shrink it), clone. The UV unwrap still there so it's easy to adjust those uv's, clone...

    I used to unfold my whole mesh, the use morph to put it back together. Only one UV step but a long hard job.
    Now I use many UV modifiers per object but all the unfolding/correcting is in UV editor in stages.
    Then after I combine all pieces again I do a final uvunwrap, getting everything clean. texture, then do a final uv correct if needed.
  • kio
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    kio polycounter lvl 15
    that sounds pretty ... complicated - such oldschool ways are not necessary anymore.

    i do mostly planar/cylindrical mapping of parts (and occasionally a pelt map) - break some uv edges where its needed and relax it till the mapping is okay.

    some reorganising will happen, thats what stich and weld are for.

    but essentially its just planar mapping with relaxing all the way ... and puzzle gaming for free.
  • MoP
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    MoP polycounter lvl 18
    Hehe, yup. I tend to do this:
    1. Planar or cylindrical map to get rid of unwanted seams.
    2. Break edges where seams are needed.
    3. Relax everything, see how it ends up.
    4. Break more edges in problem areas, or select only those verts and Relax them on their own.
    5. Stitch/move&sew as needed.

    I find this works well for pretty much any object. Sometimes a box map is a good starting point for more mechanical objects too. I tend to start with a planar map for organic meshes since the seams tend to be fairly arbitrary anyway.
  • SHEPEIRO
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    SHEPEIRO polycounter lvl 17
    select all edges that i want seams, click on roadkill button, click unwrap, clean. make coffee.
  • Baddcog
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    Baddcog polycounter lvl 9
    OK, I thought i was actually improving without using plugins...

    Actually, my mapping has gotten alot better in ALL ways. But seems I've more to learn from the polycount crew, which doesn't suprise me at all. Seems lately I've been learning all types of useful Max techniques.

    I'm normally pretty loose but do get uptight sometimes...oh wait, getting off topic.
    I was curious so I opened Max 7 and planar uv'ed a head (half head). UV Unwrapped and of course the mess I see is what I expect.

    Ah, what does this flatten mapping button do?
    8O
    Wow, that's cool, everything is laid out flat in pieces.

    Search a bit more and found relax. I can see uses for relax but I think the flatten mapping looks more useful to me.

    Anyway, I started to ask where relax was then found it:)

    Thanks for more great pointers.
  • Blaizer
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    Blaizer interpolator
    Model thinking in seams, uvs, polygonal loops, and deformations :D

    The rest is to choose edge seams and one click + tweaks.
  • Richard Kain
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    Richard Kain polycounter lvl 18
    I use Blender, so LSCM unwrap is my friend. Define which edges you want to cut up your UV map along, hit a button, and voila. Then you just tweak the mapping to optimize space to an acceptable degree and you're done. I'm soooo grateful for modern UV mapping techniques. So much easier and faster than the way it used to be.
  • mikezoo
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    mikezoo polycounter lvl 14
    Unless its a simple, simple object, (box thing or something) I never unwrap in my 3dmodeling app. I converted over to headus UVlayout. The amount of time it can save is amazing. Highly recommend it.

    http://www.uvlayout.com/

    But that's not to say you shouldn't know your Uv tools in whatever appiclation your useing. (maya, max, ect). In fact you still need to have them mastered because no matter how good you unwrap in headus or any pelting program. Your always going to need to modify/tweak it down the road in your main 3d app.


    There are other pelting programs out there to use too. I think deepPaint is one of them?
  • Michael Knubben
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    I tried uvlayout for a bit, and really hated the shit out of it. Over-complicated, terrible interface, and some really awkward ways to work.
    Could you tell me what's you find so amazing about it? I realise it's quite powerful, but couldn't get used to it quickly enough for it to really matter, speed-wise. I much preferred Roadkill despite it's simplicity (and because of it), featurewise.
  • MoP
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    MoP polycounter lvl 18
    TBH I never really worked out the value of stuff like Roadkill or UVLayout. Pelt/relax/unfold/LSCM/break/sew functions in apps like Max, Maya and Modo hardly seem different to the functionality Roadkill or UVLayout offer. Personally I much prefer not having to go through multiple apps anyway, you're in danger of losing information that way.
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