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Junior Portfolio Critique

Hi everybody, I've been learning 3D modeling for over a year and a half now, hoping to soon find professional work as a junior asset or environment artist. I'm at a point where I've just finished a somewhat lengthy portfolio piece, and before I dive head first into something new, I'd really like to take a step back and assess my skills/shortcomings to see how far I am from being ready for the industry. If anyone from the community has the time to browse through my Artstation and shoot any kind of feedback my way, it would be an enormous help. I'd be very eager to hear what you think works or doesn't work, what's missing, what you'd like to see more of, and just overall feedback for where you think my skill level is at as an artist.

Here's the link to my portfolio: https://nathaniellam.artstation.com/. I'm also thinking of making a revolver hero asset as my next step.

My sincerest thanks! :)

Replies

  • nathaniellam
    Hey FireNoodle, just want to say thanks and tell you how much I appreciate you taking the time to give me such substantial feedback. I am definitely taking note of everything you've said.

    If I may follow up with some questions though. In regards to your point about choosing to specialize in environments OR props, are you essentially recommending that my portfolio should either feature one type or the other, and never a combination of both? The reason I ask is because most of the other (hired) junior artists' portfolios I've seen consist of a variety of both environments and props. 

    Still, I totally understand your point that a portfolio would look much more cohesive if it featured either all environments or all props. That being said, the portfolio piece I'm currently working on will focus on a few detective props (revolver, badge, handcuffs) laid out on a desk. In light of the environments I already have on my portfolio, should I scrap it or not?
  • FireNoodle
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    FireNoodle triangle
     In regards to your point about choosing to specialize in environments OR props, are you essentially recommending that my portfolio should either feature one type or the other, and never a combination of both?
    No, I was saying you can be a Environment/Prop artist in your title, and still focus on both. Here's the thing with 3d environments: You're already implying that you're good at props because they make up your scene anyway. Much like your suburban neighbourhood project, you've shown that you can focus on both. 

     the portfolio piece I'm currently working on will focus on a few detective props (revolver, badge, handcuffs) laid out on a desk. In light of the environments I already have on my portfolio, should I scrap it or not?

    Good question. In my opinion, make it an environment instead with those props in it. Doesn't haft to be big, or crazy. Just something small, yet brilliant. Gather some concepts and references and go from there. And try to create a story with those said props. 
  • nathaniellam
    Good question. In my opinion, make it an environment instead with those props in it. Doesn't haft to be big, or crazy. Just something small, yet brilliant. Gather some concepts and references and go from there. And try to create a story with those said props. 
    Yeah, that's exactly what I was thinking.

    Again, thanks so much for the feedback. It can sometimes be pretty challenging knowing where to improve when self-learning, an external pair of eyes really does help to reorient me :) Cheers!
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