Feedback for my portfolio?

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I've been designing stuff for quite a few years, but I've been too nervous to show anything really outside of friends until now. I'm hoping this is gonna be my year. I'm currently doing a 100 days of level design challenge.

https://oblivious212.artstation.com/

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  • Ashervisalis
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    Ashervisalis greentooth
    Hey Robert, I'll throw a few things at you! Are you trying to make a new project for your portfolio every single day? I'm going to advise against that. Quality over quantity.

    1) House in the field: The images which have the fence in the foreground look good. There should be something breaking up the trees in the distance as they get a bit monotonous. I think you should work on your vegetation a little more because I see a lot of flatness and lines in what is meant to be organic. Check out the drawing I did on one of your images. With the grass, maybe try a bit of rotation on your mesh so there isn't a really obvious line, or add some slightly curved trees. You don't really need this many renders of the distant house, I'd cut down on how many there are. I would give an up close render of the house in the field because right now I can't tell how well that was made.



    2) R1D9: Delete this from your portfolio. Lighting is far too dark to tell whats going on. You can also tell you've used a lot of the same meshes.

    3) These 2 images seem to be exactly the same. I like the composition. It would be cool if this was in the same project as R1D10 (the house in the field).

    4) R1D7: Your environments should be telling a story. This just looks like you drew a few lakes and filled the rest with trees. I want to see a field to explore, some cliffs, a river, somewhere in the distance where I want to explore! Your water>ground transitions need to be worked on. Are you using the same tree prop for each project? That won't get you a job, or pre-job experience. I'm not sure about the water either; I can see patterns in it and its throwing off the realism.

    Are you using premade materials and/or props? It's really important to show breakdowns of how you've achieved stuff. If all you're aiming for is level design, and not art, there should be a lot more story to what you're doing, and an explanation of what you've created in the scene.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Thanks for the feedback! The grass and trees are all rotated and scaled using the foliage tool in unreal engine. Lighting seems to be the area I'm having the most problems in. As for assets I have one forest asset pack I use currently that has like 6 different varieties of trees. The goal for R1D7 was to create a large scale scene, but I probably should have given a little more open areas with like a field or something. I'm not even quite sure how to do a good transition between water and land it is something I'll have to look further into as I've noticed it as well. As for materials and props, yeah its all stuff purchased from the unreal marketplace.

    Thanks again I appreciate the feedback!
  • Hurtcules
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    Hurtcules polycounter lvl 2

    Hey Robert,

    I agree with Ashervisalis here and I also feel your portfolio is lacking actual level design. If this is what you’re trying to go for then your work should tell me that, but all I’m seeing is levels created for the sake of looks. Great if you’re focus is on environment artwork, but design needs to go deeper.

    There’s no information on why things were put where, no story, nothing to go on. When you’re designing a level you rarely ever start with any art. Even if you’re just working in Unreal and you have no game to base anything on, just make something up. Start with a template and design for that and show that. Artstation might not be the best place for that stuff, great for showing off beauty shots, but you need room to talk about your designs. Even if you just wanted to build something cool, I want to know why. I would think about looking into your own website if this can’t be done with Artstation, I haven’t used it really so idk what Artstation allows you to do.

    My other criticism would be that 100 days of level design might not really help you take your level design skills to the next level. All levels need to go through iteration and often a lot of it.  I would think about taking it slow, make a post about the level your making and get feedback on it early, rather than later. This is something I learned the hard way.

    And last thing Just looking at the names in your portfolio tells me you’re just trying to spit something out and it’s missing your personal touch and details that could make them unique to you. And again I agree with Asher, and you’ll hear it a lot in interviews, quality over quantity for sure.

    My website also needs updated with my own criticism, but take a look through here http://level-design.org/?page_id=56 Idk if you have already and idk if everything’s up to date, but there’s some solid examples in here. 

  • Robert_Aldridge
    I can honestly say I appreciate but don't understand the criticism. Level design and Environment design or art are nearly interchangeable. I have heard quality over quantity before I do believe I can do both as I do iterate over the entire course of the build and I don't post until I'm either out of time in the day or it is finished. As for names I agree I could do better with naming, but the classic "a picture is worth a thousand words" rings true the art should speak for itself. I don't see much that can compare when I look at either of your portfolios not trying to insult either I just genuinely don't understand the basis for this type of criticism.
  • Hurtcules
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    Hurtcules polycounter lvl 2
    I think you need to take a look at what your content is about then because level design to me is game play first and my criticism is I'm not seeing that. 

    Also, what would be better to show; an environment built in a day, or one built over the course of a week/month/year? 
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I agree that level design is about game play first, but the scenes I'm making for this challenge aren't part of a game they are just static shots of an image in my head. 

    As for the second I don't see how producing things at a slower rate would make a difference if the quality is the same. How quickly you can produce content is irrelevant as long as it is good. Of course, I would put more time into each scene if I had to lay out AI paths and encounters and triggers and everything else, but I don't because that isn't the purpose of this type of thing I'm doing. 
  • TheLittleJay
    The problem I think Hurt is trying to get at is right now your portfolio doesn't really show your ability to anything other than buy pre-made assets and place them into a scene. Studios want to see an understanding of how a level is made from start to finish. Also, level design and environment art overlap but are not interchangeable:

    If your focus is to get better at making cool looking environments, then you'll want to be building all of the art assets for an environment from scratch. Start with a concept you found online, or make one yourself. Don't go overboard, but you'll want to show off a mixture of hero assets, miscellaneous props and then things like the walls and ground. Get it to work in a UE4, environment artists have to make sure their work is optimised and runs smoothly. Try and get the scene lighting to look good too. Take us to a place and tell a story, make us feel something.

    If your focus is level design (which I admittedly know less about) then you'll want to be making a functioning level designed for a game. Art will probably still play a role, you could show an understanding of making some modular pieces that you can slot together. But the more important thing is making something fun to play, something that achieves the desired emotions out of the player interacting with your work. Show your grey-boxing, development, etc. Maybe making a few smaller games or prototypes of gameplay ideas. There's probably some more technical requirements that a level designer needs like coding, but again I don't know enough to speak about this with confidence. Go ask a level designer. 

    If you want to do a challenge like this (which can be a great way to learn, I admire Mike Winklemann's dedication to his 'everydays'. You can really see his progress over the years) then up your time-frame. A day is not long enough to make something meaningful with game environments. Try completing a project each month instead, then you'll have a few really cool pieces by the time 2019 rolls around. 
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I understand what you are saying, but my goal is to work with modular assets to make awesome looking scenes. While I can do 3D modeling and texture work I am not a traditional artist, but that is what an art team is for in a studio; because I don't have an art team the next best thing is outsourcing which comes in the way of marketplace assets. I understand taking your time on a level I've spent weeks to months on a few before, but the results don't feel any different to me I feel like I'm just spinning my wheels at that point.

     I think the reason single person teams generally do not make large or very good looking games is because they focus on assets and self art creation which takes a long time. I protest that if I can find something online that fits my vision and then I can buy the rights to it and incorporate it in my own way into a scene that is enough. I do have a grand vision for a larger project that I am continuously working on and I know it would never get done if I spent months or years creating all my own meshes and textures. I'm not getting any younger time is very finite.

    The entire point of this I believe is to get better and more efficient at how I iterate maybe call it micro iteration because it takes place over the course of an hour or so. Also to get ideas out of my head to share with the world of course art is subjective, but I do think that what I have created so far is beautiful even if it never makes it into a game, and if someone sees it and thinks the same and offers me a job, as unlikely as that is, its all the more helpful.

    I have to say I do appreciate all the feedback I don't want to seem ungrateful, but I think maybe its just a miscommunication.
  • pmiller001
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    pmiller001 greentooth
    So whats your goal here? Are you trying to be in video games? are you trying to be a level designer? an environment artist?  a lighting artist? etc. That ight help with any miscommunication youre talking about. 
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Well I want to do level design. More specifically my goal is to create video game levels that combine beauty and functionality but beauty comes first, not that functionality is any less important. That being said the thing that I am currently doing is creating scenes detached from core level design things such as encounters and AI movement paths. As for lighting, it is easily my weakest area when designing.
  • Ashervisalis
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    Ashervisalis greentooth
    So if you want to make a level beautiful, you're going to need to be an environment artist. This will require you do do modeling and texturing and the like. There are people who just do set design, but I believe they tend to start out as modelers. I've only ever seen the position of set design in animation, not games. You might want to rethink what skills you're going to need.

    If all you want to do is placement and level design, you've gotta be able to make games fun without the beauty of everything. Try making grey-box levels. If you can make something fun without focusing on beauty, that would help you on your path to level designer.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Why would I not focus on the beauty of the level it seems rather lazy to not.
  • pmiller001
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    pmiller001 greentooth
    Well it sounds like you want to do Level Design, and Environment Artist. 
    as for your portfolio i think all of your pieces all have the same over arching problem. It seems  that most of these are really really flat, and none of them really look complete. 

    i'd suggest
    -Taking more time on these. You will see an appreciable difference in something you spend a litte more time on, than something you "complete" in a day. 
    - For the layout of these environments, I'd suggest breaking up the monotony in some of them. FOr example, the grass in R1D11 looks like a big swatch of green stripes, ultra flat. Theres no depth to it. Maybe some dirt patches, or something. 
    -I also dont know what these closeups are for, these aren't your meshes, so unless theres some dope lighting/effects youre trying to show off,  i wouldn't put those closeups in there. 

    If youre trying to make your own environments though , id' suggest making your own assets from scratch. 
  • pmiller001
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    pmiller001 greentooth
  • Robert_Aldridge
    That makes more sense. I suppose it could be a little monotonous at some points of the scenes.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Just gray boxed a level I am working in for today. I'm trying to be open minded about using a different process... but I cant see how anyone would ever think this is more efficient than just working with the assets I have. What a waste of 30 minutes. 

  • slosh
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    slosh polycounter
    So, the issue really comes from people being confused about what you want to do.  In the industry, a level designer is someone who's main focus is to make a fun level gameplay wise.  They are more focused on how to build a level that players will find fun.  An world builder or an environment artist is the person who then makes that level look pretty.  You need to figure out what you want to do.  You will rarely get a job as a level designer where you will get to make the level pretty...that just won't be your job.  If that's what you would prefer doing, you need to learn how to model and texture 3d models.  I hope that clarifies the 2 disciplines.  Even taking purchased assets and making pretty scenes like you are doing now is not the job of a level designer...that's more of a world builder.  And you would still need a fairly impressive folio to get a job in that discipline.  So, figure out exactly what you want to do.
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
    Seriously, what Satoshi said.  This needs to be clarified before you continue forth.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    So world building would be my strength here then?

    In less time I created this, just needs to be edited to be more detailed.


  • slosh
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    slosh polycounter
    That's part of world building yes.  But to be perfectly honest, as someone who is just getting into env art, you will need to build a portfolio of assets that were done by you.  A world builder also needs to know the ins and outs of terrain generation within an engine.  Also creating tileable terrain textures will be a must.  So learning something like substance designer is highly recommended.  So do what you just did, but create some terrain, and then model and texture your own assets to create a small environment.  Don't just pull assets from a store, learn to make your own.  To be honest, most good world builders probably started as conventional env artists creating models and textures on their own.  As they grew in the industry, they most likely found that world building was what they were truly good at.  So you could just start with modeling and texturing props or small env buidings.  My point is if you are interested in the aesthetic side of building environments, you need to learn how to model and texture first.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    It seems like a waste of time when there are perfectly good assets available. I work with modular kits what I can make has little to no limit. I can do materials in the editor, textures have all been done so creating new ones is nearly pointless when a little edit can create nearly any variation. Working with terrain is one of the easiest things. As for creating 3D models I can do it I've worked in 3ds max, but I'm not comfortable with it. It again seems like a waste of time because the parts aren't as important as the whole vision.

  • Robert_Aldridge
    I really don't understand the obsession with creating my own 3D models that isn't part of my goal.
  • Doxturtle
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    Doxturtle polycounter lvl 3
    With the scene it doesn't really feel like there is a focal point or something the player is being aimed towards, it just a big open space. You need something that draws the eye towards it and gives a clear indication that this is what you are supposed to be focusing on. The scene is all pretty much similar materials and colours so everything blends together.

    I think what the others are saying is that you should focus on creating an environment from start to finish, finding a concept, blocking, building assets and getting it into unreal in an optimized state to show you have the core skills of a games artist. 

    The whole point of blocking for an environment is to test whether the scene works the way you want it to before building it and getting scales right, if you are creating assets from scratch you don't want to waste a few weeks building stuff that then doesn't look right. If you are a level artist it would likely be for testing out gameplay, does this box correctly work as cover, does this pillar get in the way etc. 

    take this project for example, they started with a blockout to test how the city would work before they went in and built the structures in final art:

    http://polycount.com/discussion/192103/the-resistance

    If you want to learn about level designing for gameplay purposes, TF2 level designers on Youtube are really interesting. They show how they take a really basic blockout and use this as the basis for an environment. They spend weeks play testing a design to make sure that players react the way they expect them to. A blockout kind of serves two different (but intertwined) purposes depending on what role you are focusing on.

    EDIT: What others are saying is that if you want to get hired you need to show you can do more than just place assets in a scene. You need to show you can make assets, modular pieces, tiling materials etc. The whole point of using your own assets is to show what you can do on your own. Even if the assets exist already, you won't be much use outside of a very narrow job role unless you can do the rest of the work. 


  • TheLittleJay
    Seconding what Slosh said, he really hit the proverbial nail. You won't get a job where your sole purpose to take a collection of pre-made assets (made by the art team) and place them into a level at your discretion. So if you want a job within the games industry, you'll have to choose which side of development you prefer / are better at. 

    They way levels are usually built in game studios is as a collaboration; level designers will use greyboxes while they are first building the level, since their priority is how fun it is to play, not how beautiful it looks. By only using grey boxes they can quickly make drastic changes without wasting any assets.

    Once this greybox level is mostly done, and no more major changes are going to be made, the artists get involved. They take the layout of the level and make good looking assets to replace all of the grey boxes. (There was a good video by Blizzard recently showing off the early versions of Overwatch. Skim through that and you'll see what I mean). 

    You felt the greybox thing was a waste of time because you already have a bunch of assets ready to go. But a game studio would start with zilch. So they use greyboxing as a way to give the level designers maximum freedom as well as not wasting time and money designing a bunch of assets that end up unusable. They don't bring in a 3rd party to take all of the assets and arrange them (what you're currently doing).

    Once you know which direction you want to pursue, you'll be able to get more focused feedback for your portfolio and advice on what you should be doing to improve your skills as an artist / designer. Polycount is full of people who wanna help others, but right now all your work exists in this strange middle-ground. You're doing the worst of both worlds, since you're neither making your own assets nor making levels with good gameplay. Thus we can't move forward with our advice until this issue is resolved. 

    I hope this helps, since if it doesn't we'll all be going round in circles. My 2 pence is that you would prefer the environment art side of things, since you seem most concerned with making your scenes look good. There's plenty of resources on the internet to help you get better at 3D modelling / textures as well. 
  • slosh
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    slosh polycounter
    Doxturtle said:

    EDIT: What others are saying is that if you want to get hired you need to show you can do more than just place assets in a scene. You need to show you can make assets, modular pieces, tiling materials etc. The whole point of using your own assets is to show what you can do on your own. Even if the assets exist already, you won't be much use outside of a very narrow job role unless you can do the rest of the work. 


    Basically this.  What you are doing is nothing special.  There are thousands of people who can do what you are calling your "strength."  Honestly, it's not that hard.  Basic modeling isn't that hard either.  Learning to create efficient models for games and learning to texture within those confines is what is hard...esp if you want it to look good.  Doing proper terrain is hard...if you are thinking it is easy, you are sorely mistaken and clearly have no been in a gamedev env.  Good environment artists/world builders are hired because they already have these basic core skills in their skillset.  If you don't have them, there is just no way you have a chance at that kind of a job.  Now, if you want to be a level designer and not make art, focus on gameplay fundamentals.  Make levels for moddable games that are fun.  That should be your goal for a level designer.  I think your thoughts on becoming a world builder or a level designer are far too naive.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Pretty harsh... I do feel like my art is special give a thousand different artists a set of assets you will get a thousand different scenes. People have gotten jobs modding video game levels I don't see how this is any less.

    Whatever the case I appreciate the criticism. 

  • Doxturtle
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    Doxturtle polycounter lvl 3
    Hopefully I didn't come across harsh, just reiterating what others were explaining. There probably are cases of people getting jobs just with level creation experience, but having a solid background in modelling/texturing etc would drastically improve your chances of getting a job in industry, also makes you far more of an asset to the company.

    Think of it this way, who's better to keep around, the guy who can do initial art blocking, modular planning/construction, asset building, set dressing or the person who only has quality experience set dressing? You have to make yourself as valuable as possible to a company, so you have to be able to fit into multiple areas of development.  

    Anyways, learning how to make your assets is still a good idea, you can add your own unique touches that aren't in 1000 other peoples scenes, if you only stick to marketplace assets your work will always have elements of other peoples creations. Maybe what you want just isn't in the marketplace for some reason. 

    Nice progress on the scene, the weird light blue tint to the water is distracting, I assume that's just some transparency bug. 
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I mean I don't just do the level design I can do programming as well, but this is my passion. The blue tint is probably just something weird with the fog. 
  • slosh
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    slosh polycounter
    I think it sounds harsh to you cuz it’s not what you want to hear. And no one is saying you can’t get a job. But you have to put in the work. You are calling your compositions “your art” but really it’s not. And while some modders may have gotten jobs in the past, I rarely see that happening anymore. And if they are, it’s because they are making fun levels that people are actually enjoying and they are getting recognition for making those levels. That is less about art and more about gameplay and understanding what makes it fun. If you want to do the art side, you have to actually make the art, bottom line. There’s just no way around that. 
  • Robert_Aldridge
    So I suppose a musician has to build their own guitar and find brand new chords in order to create great music with it?

  • Robert_Aldridge
    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts...
  • slosh
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    slosh polycounter
    Lol I give up. You’re good man. Apply away!
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
    That last post was sarcasm, EDIT: Robert, just to clarify

    Richard, take it from someone else who’s lived in Virginia, what you’re hoping to jus do right now is NOT going to get your foot in the door.  Seriously take Satoshi’s advice. 

    Theres so so much weird implicit experiential stuff you learn when you’re finally developing a game to finish and shipped. And it’s clear that with the way you’re talking about this, you haven’t finished making a game of any scale. 

    The musician analogy is a flimsy one.  You’re not anywhere close to being able to play music technically well, let alone construct instruments. Or not even that, understanding that music involves sound  engineering and marketing and audience feedback, etc. 

    Seriously take Satoshi’s advice seriously. The world builder we had at InXile was still expected to drop into 3dsMax and model stuff, make textures, etc instead of always going to another artist to get something new made.

    i don’t know what you consider editing, but the polish you’re doing is far from done for what we expect a playable environment to be. 
  • nicko_the_great
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    nicko_the_great polycounter lvl 5
    With this attitude towards constructive critiques, Maybe you have to learn the hard way
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I am trying to take criticism but its kinda hard when what I'm basically getting is that my work is meaningless.
    Also who is Richard? 
  • Doxturtle
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    Doxturtle polycounter lvl 3
    No ones saying its meaningless, just that you need a broader set of skills to get into industry. Your work is nice, no ones disputing that, they are just saying that industry requires a bit more than that
  • Robert_Aldridge
  • BonaB
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    BonaB triangle
    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts...
    Put your work side by side with NaughtyDog work for example, be honest about it. That is what you want in terms of quality, you won't reach that level of quality buying assets from a store and placing stuff around, study and research what are the things that have to be done by an environment artist to achieve that level, you live in the USA stop beeing stubborn and go seek information, if you are too lazy to work hard for something you are passionate about, you are not passionate about it, you are just lying to yourself.

    And please don't come saying that it is too much to compare your work with top level work, because if you are not doing that you are simply destined to end up beeing mediocre at best.
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I quite frequently compare my work to the pros at companies like that. I place myself currently in between normal indie and pro.
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
    Robert, have you made any games yet?  What's your background?  Where are you coming from?
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I've been modding games since 2006 ish I started developing the idea for a game in 2012 and started development around 2014 with several .. lets just call them delays. I've been working on the project for about a solid year or two now.

    I've modeled stuff in 3ds max before, but I noticed how long it took to complete anything. With that in mind I realised that it wasn't feasible to make all my own assets. Purchasing assets and even commissioning them when need be is a core part of my strategy to develop larger scale things as a solo team. I will defend using modular assets forever. If companies like Bethesda can do it so can I.

    I have a working knowledge of texture editing software such as photoshop and have created my own textures before. I have looked into substance designer and it is currently on my back log of things to learn just because it looks so interesting.

    I have an understanding of a few different programming languages. My most comfortable probably being python not that its really of any use in the unreal engine. I do most of my game code using blueprints.

    The current version of my game has working HUD and journal system, frameworks for skill increases and player leveling, a map, and I'm working on one of the cites now as well as various other systems and things.
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
    I see.  That's quite the timeline as an indie dev.  What's the elevator pitch for the game?  Do you have a demoable prototype/vertical slice?
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Interesting enough I noticed recently when i was thrown into a circle of conversation at a party that I don't really have a good elevator pitch for the game. All I really have as an explanation for that is that its a medieval fantasy RPG. As for a prototype I want to have something really "playable" by the end of the year. I suppose I have early builds that are playable now but I'm not comfortable with anyone seeing them outside of friends and family.

  • Robert_Aldridge
    What do you mean by that's quite the time line anyways like is that good or bad?
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
    Maybe?  It depends on what they delays were, if you were in the military, if you were in school or something else was happening. I'd be interested in hearing what happened inbetween idea inception and then actual dev work starting.  Would help me get a better context of where you were coming from originally with the 100 days of level design idea.

    That is concerning for me as a fellow developer and someone who's worked on prototypes before that there doesn't seem to be an elevator pitch beyond that it's a medieval fantasy RPG.  Are you hoping to be a very action oriented RPG, or a narrative dense one, one about systems interacting and impressing on the player, or something else entirely?  I know getting an MVP on an RPG is magnitudes harder, but are there specific features that you hope players really glom onto?
  • Robert_Aldridge
    Well to put simply the delays were caused by me being homeless for a time. 

    I want it to be rather action oriented, but not so much that the game feels rushed. Exploration is an important part as are all the many systems in the game. I have hundreds of cards on trello with my design. 
  • Hurtcules
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    Hurtcules polycounter lvl 2
    Buying assets on the market place in place of doing it yourself for an indie game is fine and is a smart time / money saver which is why it exists on the market place, but studios who offer jobs to artists and designers don't really do that. They hire these roles to make that content. So if you want a job at one of these places you need to learn to make the content.

    Now if that's not the goal here and you just want to make your own game with store bought assets then that should have been stated from the start. 
  • tac0m
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    tac0m polycounter lvl 6
    Hey Robert,
    While I think every person here can remember that spunk and huge drive to create a bunch of stuff, like what you have now. They are giving you feedback on things they have learned through their times failing, and learning along the way. They are passing on their guidance to you in hopes you don't waste your time and make the same mistakes.
    Satoshi works at Amazon and knows his shit. He's well respected in the video games community. If he gives you feedback its probably because he sees potential in you. What you're doing is being too butthurt to take his critiques because it doesn't align with your initial view. This is bad and you will not last long if you ever get in games because you have to keep your ego at the door. You might say you appreciate the feedback but then say it's a waste of time.

    I will tell you that the reason you greybox (blockout) a level without using premade art assets is because when you're designing a level, you give zero fucks about art. The level MUST work. The game MUST play well. The art comes after a strong layout is established. 

    If you just use premade assets because they are at your disposal that is not what happens in game production. Trust me, i work in games too and level designers do not just pick from a library. They block out something that works with the game.

    A blockout is not meaningless. You use blockout or greyblock models because they give a very high level intention for a level or mission. Once a playable area works with how a designer wants a game or mission to play, thats when the greyblock models are replaced with art.

    Dont look at it as wasted art. Look at it as being able to convey intent or meaning with simplicity. It costs a studio a lot less to quickly iterate through a blocked out level than it does to have a bunch of assets created and added and then have to redo it. I hear your point that you've made a few times that if you have assets then why not use them. Here's why you don't use them.
    1. A studio doesn't work that way.
    2. You want to try and create your level and give yourself as close to studio experience as possible. 
    3. You want to show a potential employer you understand the process of level design. 

    I hope you reread what people have already said because they are pointing you in the right direction.

    Cheers dude
  • Robert_Aldridge
    I definitely do want to make my own game using assets from the store that's no secret you're right I probably should have put that in the beginning. 

    I understand the process of level design how it's truly about creating a fun playable space. This is not lost on me, that being said there are companies that front load the art schedule and don't do gray boxing at all like Bethesda for instance their tools don't even have gray boxing possibilities.
  • Hurtcules
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    Hurtcules polycounter lvl 2
    Just because you don't see it, doesn't mean they don't do it. 
    Maybe reach out to some Bethesda members and try and see what they're designers and artists are doing. 
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