[Video] 8 Things You Need To Know To Get A Job In The Game Industry

vertex
Hey there, people!

This video that I've found by Ryan Kingslien, I think this belongs here for those people like me to watch and learn a bit about what to expect finding a job as a Game Artist!



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  • Bedrock
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    Bedrock polycounter lvl 4
    Cool video! Mostly for character artists tho. Is 6 months on a single character model really a thing..?
  • theCrimelord
    Bedrock said:
    Cool video! Mostly for character artists tho. Is 6 months on a single character model really a thing..?

    I don't know if that's a thing but what he says is that you have to be "willing" to do that for something, to achieve that perfection you want. I think this means that if you have to give 6 months to learning something specific to be able to go pro, then be it
  • Brian "Panda" Choi
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    Brian "Panda" Choi polycounter lvl 5
    6 months usually accounts for the fact that you're probably making edits or waiting on blocked tasks during the duration of the project.  First passes on characters warrant additional iterations if, say, your shader artist says "We have a better method of doing hair; we need to redo the hair textures to make this happen."
  • theCrimelord
    Here's another interesting video!
    This man started working in films now in MPC London because of just working on One Model, as shown in the video here.
    The time it took for him to finish that model was 3 Months so this is something to look at and go through!

    Video :
    https://www.gameartinstitute.com/p/character-artist-video-2

    Link to the model they're talking about :
    https://www.artstation.com/artwork/Ggo0V


  • Elithenia
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    Elithenia polycounter lvl 2
    Great videos, Thank you! 
  • apllana
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    apllana Polycount Sponsor

    I for one am glad the crazy idea of someone working 6 months on a character is even out there. I've been working on mine for the last 8 months or so (roughly 2-5 hours per day, peaking at 18) with absolute zero experience in several key areas such as head anatomy, eye setup and hair cards. I've been very hesitant about posting this image, but here and now feels like a good idea. It's a little outdated but still relevant, hope you guys don't mind!



    This represents my progress spanning 9 weeks of soul crushing trial and error. Notice how my first attempt looks like a potato, it be bad. In the end it's by no means perfect, or perhaps even good, but I'm dead set to making another forward leap as significant as the one before soon.

    Returning to the topic, there have been numerous times when I thought this approach might not be the most efficient for learning, that I bit more than I could possibly chew, all at the same time. I was attempting to make simultaneous improvements in every area (anatomy, micro details, texturing, eye geometry, lighting and the variety of shaders). Speaking generally, perhaps setting lower standards or severely limiting your scope would allow you to see the end result much sooner, creating a tighter feedback loop without having to delay gratification to such an extent. Another way of looking at it is that you can never overestimate the negative impact the complexity of a task can have on your productivity, especially if you don't have a clear battle plan.

    On the other hand, powering through the lack of motivation, exposure or feedback (we all know how that works) can be a great exercise in building up the conscientiousness that is so important to bringing any task to completion. The point here is to rely less on motivation and to highlight the importance of schedules, learning to love the process and the self discipline necessary for doing something even if you don't feel like doing it.
  • theCrimelord
    apllana said:

    I for one am glad the crazy idea of someone working 6 months on a character is even out there. I've been working on mine for the last 8 months or so (roughly 2-5 hours per day, peaking at 18) with absolute zero experience in several key areas such as head anatomy, eye setup and hair cards. I've been very hesitant about posting this image, but here and now feels like a good idea. It's a little outdated but still relevant, hope you guys don't mind!



    This represents my progress spanning 9 weeks of soul crushing trial and error. Notice how my first attempt looks like a potato, it be bad. In the end it's by no means perfect, or perhaps even good, but I'm dead set to making another forward leap as significant as the one before soon.

    Returning to the topic, there have been numerous times when I thought this approach might not be the most efficient for learning, that I bit more than I could possibly chew, all at the same time. I was attempting to make simultaneous improvements in every area (anatomy, micro details, texturing, eye geometry, lighting and the variety of shaders). Speaking generally, perhaps setting lower standards or severely limiting your scope would allow you to see the end result much sooner, creating a tighter feedback loop without having to delay gratification to such an extent. Another way of looking at it is that you can never overestimate the negative impact the complexity of a task can have on your productivity, especially if you don't have a clear battle plan.

    On the other hand, powering through the lack of motivation, exposure or feedback (we all know how that works) can be a great exercise in building up the conscientiousness that is so important to bringing any task to completion. The point here is to rely less on motivation and to highlight the importance of schedules, learning to love the process and the self discipline necessary for doing something even if you don't feel like doing it.

    That is great to see, man! There's surely a lot of improvements, if something takes time, I guess we let it take time as long as we're still learning.
    I'm thinking of working on a couple of models to improve them from time to time (these will be side projects to work on to make them as realistic as possible on the go) as I keep modeling and sculpting other characters for my portfolio.
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