Getting into environmental modeling. Questions!

keyframe
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Larry keyframe
Hey guys,  going straight to the point.

When i create a material, lets say metal with some rust on it, if I apply that in different objects, does it stretch it, looking the same? Lets say I have metal houses, metal doors and stuff, if I apply the same material with all with the rust on it, will everything look the same? 

Do I have to create the rust in a different material and apply it on the surface?

And also the first project I will be making is an industrial inhabited area with bridges connecting the houses, and inbetween there would be a cliff, im thinking overall matrix style. So do I also model that huge cliff and the bottom as well? Do I somehow paint it instead? 

I really have no idea on how to execute this since its my first environment project. Any help greatly appreciated.

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  • Menchen
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    Menchen triangle
    Some of those questions extend not only to environmental modelling, but to every kind of modelling.

    1-When you create a material, that material will be the same no matter what object you apply it on. Whether it stretches out or where it tiles (if it goes out of the 0-to-1-space) will be determined by your model UVs. If you are going to follow the "one material for multiple objects" 'worflow' I would reccomend not placing 'hero' details in your materials.

    2-It depends; if that material is a generally rusted material, put the rust inside the material itself. If it's metal but with rust on just certain areas of that material, I would reccomend having that rust as a separate material (and then use vertex blending) or as a decal over your base metal material.

    3-As you would do with every model, You have to start from blocking out the whole scene in a very simple and basic way to get an idea of what you want and what works for the scene composition, and then you start doing detail passes, adding detail and complexity to the model evenly and progresively. For the cliff and rocks, you can try sculpting some rocks and terrain and use them to form bigger shapes (such as the cliff) or use a terrain tool such as worldmachine.
  • NoRank
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    NoRank triangle
    You could use layered materials or masks to put that kind of info with a separated rust material. Still, keep in mind that this is not really that cheap as having one material. 
  • Larry
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    Larry keyframe
    NoRank said:
    You could use layered materials or masks to put that kind of info with a separated rust material. Still, keep in mind that this is not really that cheap as having one material. 
    So the best solution to use as little memory as possible, would be to have 1 metal material with the rust, all in one, and apply it to everything with some offset to look different?
  • Eric Chadwick
    Many material techniques explained here. I would recommend using vertex color to blend tiling textures for metal and rust, all in one shader. If you blend multiple materials that starts to get expensive to render in a game...
    http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/MultiTexture

    See also
    http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/Category:EnvironmentModularity
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